Ocarina of Time Spirit Stones Explained

The story of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time spends much of his time re-developing the tradition of Hyrule generated by his predecessors, namely Link to the past. One thing he keeps in mind but the changes are the Spiritual Stones and their exact purpose.

A lot of Ocarina from Time‘s The story revolves around the three goddesses Din, Nayru and Farore. After the three goddesses created Earth, Law and Life respectively, they left behind the Triforce. However, leaving the Triforce in the mortal world has led to a Hyrulean Civil War that takes place before the events of the game, a war that has lasting ramifications for Link.

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Spiritual stones and their narrative weight

The formula based on Nintendo’s history for the Zelda the series begins with the release of A link to the past, which first tasks players with acquiring the Master Sword by obtaining the three Pendants of Virtue. These pendants were the first iteration of a now-recurring quest for three MacGuffins, and in Ocarina of time Nintendo has chosen to turn the pendants into spiritual stones. Pendants of Virtue grant Link the ability to draw the Master Sword from its pedestal, and Spirit Stones grant him the same access. Yet the stones have more narrative weight behind them.

Spiritual Stones are divine objects which are essentially useless in themselves. Before the events of Ocarina of time was the Hyrulean Civil War. The point where the three creation goddesses left the world is the location of the Triforce, which has the power to grant any wish to whoever comes in contact with it, and therefore all of Hyrule has gone to war. for that power. In order to stop the war and restore balance to Hyrule, the Triforce has been locked in the Holy Realm behind the Time Gate. The location of the Triforce was believed to be kept a secret from the Hyrule Royal Family.

Sealing the door is the power of the three Spirit Stones offered to the Guardians of the Three Races: the Emerald of Kokiri was given to the Great Mojo Tree, the Ruby of Goron to the ancestors of Darunia, and the Sapphire of Zora to the Zora Royalty. Ganondorf’s evil plan to claim the Triforce is discovered by the Guardians and he does not receive the Stones, which leads him to curse each of the Guardian Deities.

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Link’s Quest for the Spiritual Stones

ocarina of time link ruto zora sapphire

The player’s quest for Spirit Stones begins with the acquisition of the Kokiri Emerald, attributed to Link by the Great Mojo Tree: the Guardian Deity of the Kokiri Forest. The Great Mojo Tree dies after offering the stone to Link, but not before explaining the story of Hyrule’s creation. It’s a highlight because it shows how strong Ganondorf could become if he were to gain access to the Triforce – which generates a real sense of urgency in the world. With the first stone in hand, Link receives the other two.

The Spiritual Stones turn against the land of Hyrule, however, as Link breaks the seal of the Time Gate and grants Ganondorf access to the Sacred Realm where he obtains the Triforce of Power. In this sense, it seems that the Spirit Stones’ duty to protect the Triforce has only delayed the inevitable. However, the Triforce did not fully grant themselves to Ganondorf, letting him collect the other two pieces from their owners: Link and Zelda. Perhaps it was only a matter of time until someone of evil gained access to the sacred realm, then it would make sense for the Seven Sages to be a backup plan for order to be restored, this who takes the rest of Link’s adventure.

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time 3D is available on the 3DS.

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