Hear the differences between Renaissance and Baroque flutes at the music festival

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Submitted by the Salish Sea Early Music Festival

The sixth performance of the 2017 Salish Sea Early Music Festival, “Baroque in Transition: 1600-1700,” highlights an evolving musical perspective of the 17th century in Italy and France. The concert will take place at 1 p.m. on Sunday, May 14, 2017 at Brickworks, 150 Nichols Street in Friday Harbor and features Seattle Baroque Orchestra founder Ingrid Matthews on baroque violin, Indiana University professor Elisabeth Wright on harpsichord and flautist Jeffrey Cohan playing both the Renaissance monobloc flute and the baroque single-key flute.

The Salish Sea Early Music Festival offers a new perspective on 17th century performance practice for two soprano and harpsichord instruments. The Renaissance flute, violin, and harpsichord, once a familiar combination of instruments, have been rarely heard since the flute underwent a fundamental evolution in the late 17th century. Although the Baroque period in music is believed to begin around 1600, some instruments, notably the transverse flute, were slower than others to evolve to adapt to the stylistic currents of the time. This program is an opportunity to hear side by side the types of Renaissance and Baroque flute linked to these evolving musical colors, very different in France and in Italy.

The program will include works from early 17th century Italy by Giovanni Legrenzi, Marco Uccellini, Giovanni Battista Buonamente, Tarquinio Merula and Girolamo Frescobaldi, and late 17th century France and Italy by Louis Couperin, Marin Marais, Jean-Baptiste Lully and Archange Corelli.

2017 Salish Sea Early Music Festival performance schedule on San Juan Island: (Each is made at Brickworks).

1 p.m., Sunday May 14

A century of new perspectives: 1600-1700: Chamber music in transition, including 17th century trios on late Renaissance and early Baroque instruments. Ingrid Matthews, violin; Elisabeth Wright, harpsichord; Jeffrey Cohan, baroque and renaissance flutes

7 p.m., Saturday June 10

Giuliani’s guitar: virtuoso works from the beginning of the golden age of the 19th century for flute and guitar. John Schneiderman, guitar; Jeffrey Cohan, eight key flute

Hear the differences between Renaissance and Baroque flutes at the music festival
Hear the differences between Renaissance and Baroque flutes at the music festival

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