Got a dusty musical instrument? Nonprofit will accept your donation: NPR

0

Hungry for Music is a non-profit organization that receives donations of musical instruments, renovates them and distributes them to needy music students across the country.



NOEL KING, HOST:

Millions of us are stuck at home during the pandemic. We cook. We are gardening. We make TikTok videos. And we’re cleaning our closets, attics and basements, which is great news for a nonprofit called Hungry for Music. He donates instruments to schools, and donations are on the rise. A lot of schools, of course, don’t have in-person lessons, but that means they need instruments because kids can’t share them now.

JEFF CAMPBELL: It’s like putting together a puzzle.

KING: It’s director Jeff Campbell filling his minivan with instruments in Mount Jackson, Virginia.

CAMPBELL: Today we’re picking up – looks like twenty instruments that are going to go to the junior musicians of the Appalachians. I’ll load it up, and we’ll go. And I guess we should start. Alright, let’s go.

(EXCERPT FROM STARTING THE ENGINE)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Campbell drives three hours south to meet Brett Morris.

BRETT MORRIS: I am the director of Junior Appalachian Musicians. And we are the parent organization of approximately 55 after-school traditional music education programs called JAM.

MARTIN: For most of the families in the program, buying a violin or banjo just isn’t financially feasible.

MORRIS: Hungry for Music has contributed – no pun intended – to the success of JAM programs across Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee for over 10 years now, donating over 500 instruments. It’s a big part of life here. We’re really looking to connect as many kids as possible so they can be proud of where they’re from.

KING: The New River JAM Band is training for an upcoming gig. It’s their first time together in person in months.

(EXTRACT FROM THE ARCHIVED RECORD)

NEW RIVER JAM BAND: (Singing) There is a time for love and laughter. The days will pass like summer thunderstorms. The winter wind will then follow. But there is love, and love is warm.

KING: Half of these children play instruments donated by Hungry for Music. They are all between 11 and 16 years old, but among them they have decades of experience.

KARLEE HAMM: Music is like the air I breathe. It has always been around me. And I hope he always will be. Hi, my name is Karlee Hamm. I’m from Ashe County, North Carolina, I’m 13, and I play guitar. (Playing guitar).

SOPHIA PUCKETT: Hello. My name is Sophia Puckett. I am 16 years old and I am from Galax, Virginia. And I play the mandolin. (I play the mandolin). Music has always been a very important part of my life. If I didn’t have it, I really don’t think I would be able to.

KING: As you can hear, music is very much a part of life in this region.

CAMPBELL: So here’s the double bass. He seems ready to go.

JIM LLOYD: Yes. Where is Logan (ph)? Look at this stuff.

CAMPBELL: Oh, my God.

LLOYD: It’s loaded (laughs).

CAMPBELL: I’m telling you.

LLOYD: I’m Jim Lloyd. I am the program director for Junior Appalachian Musicians. I am also a barber from this town. Every time Jeff comes it’s like Christmas – lots of happy kids.

(EXCERPT FROM THE PERFORMANCE OF THE NEW RIVER JAM BAND FROM SCRUGGS “FOGGY MOUNTAIN BREAKDOWN”)

CAMPBELL: I made a few sacrifices, but did I really do it? You know, because I do what I love. I do what excites me. I feel like it’s a gift, a privilege to be able to do what I do. And I’m excited about it. It’s a lot of work. I’m overwhelmed. But I really wish we were – if a kid needs an instrument, Hungry for Music is the place to go.

(EXCERPT FROM THE PERFORMANCE OF THE NEW RIVER JAM BAND FROM SCRUGGS “FOGGY MOUNTAIN BREAKDOWN”)

MARTIN: Program Director Jeff Campbell. Hungry for Music has donated approximately 15,000 instruments to music programs across the country.

Copyright © 2020 NPR. All rights reserved. See the terms of use and permissions pages on our website at www.npr.org for more information.

NPR transcripts are created under rushed deadlines by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative recording of NPR’s programming is the audio recording.


Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.