Musical instrument – Clay Wood Winds http://clay-wood-winds.com/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 09:28:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://clay-wood-winds.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Musical instrument – Clay Wood Winds http://clay-wood-winds.com/ 32 32 Gift of the 100th musical instrument | Arts https://clay-wood-winds.com/gift-of-the-100th-musical-instrument-arts/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 13:40:00 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/gift-of-the-100th-musical-instrument-arts/ Seven years ago, a Brevard High student’s violin was destroyed by the weather while she and her family were living in a tent. The story of this homeless young girl, who regularly volunteers to organize Brevard Philharmonic concerts, inspired one of the orchestra’s violinists, Aleta Tisdale, to launch a program allowing students to play music […]]]>

Seven years ago, a Brevard High student’s violin was destroyed by the weather while she and her family were living in a tent.

The story of this homeless young girl, who regularly volunteers to organize Brevard Philharmonic concerts, inspired one of the orchestra’s violinists, Aleta Tisdale, to launch a program allowing students to play music regardless of their financial situation.

“I just had this idea,” Tisdale said. “I wonder how many kids would love to play but can’t afford the instrument?”

On Tuesday, Tisdale and Philharmonic Orchestra Board President-elect Carole Futrelle presented the 100th instrument in the Brevard Philharmonic Orchestra’s Donate Your Instrument program to Rosman Middle School.

The program collects donated musical instruments, pays to repair them, and then donates them to county schools so teachers can distribute them each year to students who can borrow them for as long as they stay in class.

Besides the many flutes, clarinets, drums, saxophones and trumpets, the program also repairs violins, mandolins, guitars and other stringed instruments.

Hazel Ketcham, one of Rosman’s music teachers and also director of the Mountain School of Strings, was thrilled to receive three classical guitars on Tuesday.

“No one will be inspired to play classical guitar if we don’t have classical guitars,” said Ketcham, who quickly tuned all three guitars in front of his students. Ketcham, who is a trained classical guitarist, played a tune on one of the newly restored instruments demonstrating strumming and Spanish chords, then handed them out to three students to try out.

“Isn’t that pretty?” she asked them.

A flute was then given to Katerina Canter, director of the Rosman Orchestral Program, who teaches middle school and high school orchestras.

“2021 has been an exceptional year,” Tisdale said. “A local family donated 12 instruments and also paid for any restoration costs incurred for the donated instruments, an extremely generous gift to the community.”

Every middle school and high school teacher in Transylvania County is contacted and instruments are assigned based on the needs of each school.

Since the program’s inception in October 2015, more than $5,000 in cash has also been donated to repair broken strings, clean cases, polish brass instruments, repair cracks and replace pads so instruments can be playable again. .

On Thursday, Tisdale will deliver a saxophone and trombone to Brevard High School, setting the count at 103 donated instruments.

“If you know someone who has an instrument that’s not in use, I know someone who will take that away from you, get it fixed, and put it in the school,” Futrelle said. “Our neighbours’ children deserve the same chance as everyone else. If you learn music now, you’ll love music forever.

More instruments and money to repair them are needed to continue the program.

Donations will be gladly accepted at the next Brevard Philharmonic concert, “Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich,” at the Porter Center on September 25 at 3 p.m.

Visit www.brevardphilharmonic.org or call (828) 884-4221 for more information.

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This Pneumatic Hybrid of a Vehicle and a Musical Instrument Tests the Limits of Sound – EDM.com https://clay-wood-winds.com/this-pneumatic-hybrid-of-a-vehicle-and-a-musical-instrument-tests-the-limits-of-sound-edm-com/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 17:31:46 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/this-pneumatic-hybrid-of-a-vehicle-and-a-musical-instrument-tests-the-limits-of-sound-edm-com/ I don’t want to sound my own horn… As part of its joint project “Two Yamahas, One Passion”, Yamaha Design Lab has designed an unexpected piece of technology: a mobile musical instrument powered by gas and air. With the new concept, dubbed “Untitled Instrument”, two Yamaha departments have joined forces to rethink the principle of […]]]>

I don’t want to sound my own horn…

As part of its joint project “Two Yamahas, One Passion”, Yamaha Design Lab has designed an unexpected piece of technology: a mobile musical instrument powered by gas and air.

With the new concept, dubbed “Untitled Instrument”, two Yamaha departments have joined forces to rethink the principle of sound and how it can be used in conjunction with modern automotive engineering technology. If the airflow through a wind or brass instrument, such as a trumpet, is properly controlled, a musical scale can be played. This same air is also used to power the propulsion of the bike.

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The oldest musical instrument in the world | Classical music https://clay-wood-winds.com/the-oldest-musical-instrument-in-the-world-classical-music/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 19:26:05 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/the-oldest-musical-instrument-in-the-world-classical-music/ In 2009, an ancient flute, believed to be the oldest musical instrument in the world, was discovered in a cave in Germany. Made from vulture bone, the instrument dates back to when humans began to colonize Europe, around 33,000 BC. The discovery by a group of scientists led them to believe that humans played music […]]]>

In 2009, an ancient flute, believed to be the oldest musical instrument in the world, was discovered in a cave in Germany. Made from vulture bone, the instrument dates back to when humans began to colonize Europe, around 33,000 BC. The discovery by a group of scientists led them to believe that humans played music much earlier than previously thought.

Fragments of three flutes were discovered in the Hohle Fels cave in southwestern Germany by a team from the University of Tübingen. The nearly complete vulture bone flute is 20cm long, has five finger holes and v-shaped notches that would have served as a mouthpiece. Scientists believe that the instrument would have been held like a recorder, but the player would have blown on it like a flute. The other two flutes unearthed by archaeologists are made of ivory, thought to come from mammoth tusks.

The discovery of flutes suggests that music was an important part of everyday life for early modern humans. And playing music may have helped maintain beneficial social networks, perhaps helping to explain why modern humans survived while the Neanderthals they coexisted with died out.

“Music was used in many kinds of social contexts: maybe religious, maybe recreational – much like we use music today in many kinds of contexts,” says professor Nicholas Conard from the university. from Tubingen to BBC News. “Modern humans who came to our region already possessed a whole range of symbolic objects, figurative art, representations of mythological creatures, many types of personal ornaments and also a well-developed musical tradition.”

Top image by Getty Images

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What the musical instrument you played as a child says about you now https://clay-wood-winds.com/what-the-musical-instrument-you-played-as-a-child-says-about-you-now/ Fri, 08 Jul 2022 15:18:58 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/what-the-musical-instrument-you-played-as-a-child-says-about-you-now/ To all the pianists, have you ever learned to say no to your parents? It’s happened to all of us: being forced to play a musical instrument by our parents or our school. Rest in peace to the days when you would have an hour of class to go sit in the meeting room and […]]]>

To all the pianists, have you ever learned to say no to your parents?

It’s happened to all of us: being forced to play a musical instrument by our parents or our school. Rest in peace to the days when you would have an hour of class to go sit in the meeting room and make an awful noise with an ocarina. My ears are still reeling from those tenor horn lessons I used to be forced into with my whole class. If that wasn’t real music, then what is?

Whether your musical career came to a halt after leaving fourth grade and you never had to touch a recorder again, or you thrived as a musician and reached first grade on the piano – everyone has their own memories of when music and instruments were a fundamental part of our learning. Gone, but never forgotten.

So let’s go and find out what your musical history says about you:

Recorder

Initially easy, if your musical talent goes so far as to play the recorder in elementary school and never see it again, it’s clear you weren’t dedicated to the cause. It’s safe to say your talents lie in other areas, and these days your musical prowess extends to listening to a Spotify playlist on repeat. Nothing to be ashamed of – but not exactly unique. Who knows? Maybe one day you’ll open that recorder bag, remember how to play hot buns, and never look back. But then again…maybe not.

What university did you go to: Leeds

tenor horn

Another generic grade school choice, though slightly more boujee than a simple recorder or ocarina. The tenor horn requires some skill, which is probably why it sounded absolutely terrible every time you put your hand to it. If you played tenor horn as a kid, suffice it to say you probably went to an upper class, private school, and are still living off daddy’s money now…despite being 24 and that you graduated from university three years ago.

What university did you go to: Durham

Piano

Alright, I’m a little more serious now. If you played the piano after elementary school, it implies some sort of interest in the musical field, from your mother if not from you. You were probably forced to do it and either really enjoyed it and pushed it further, or you made a deal that if you passed your freshman exam, you could drop out.

Those of you who have pursued it will either have been playing the piano all your life, or you stopped after GCSEs and only use it occasionally to show off to your friends – if that’s you, you should probably try to find a new hobby. , because this one is getting a little old. However, if you’re one of those who pushed their parents to let you down after first grade, you’re probably breaking it up in the big world, putting those God-given negotiation skills to good use. We may see each other in the next season of The Apprentice.

What university did you go to: Bristol

Trumpet

Trumpeters were the dark horses of high school, and that’s still true today. People who weren’t exclusively musical, but could play football, run, and get A’s. If you were a trumpet player in your youth, chances are you still are. You enjoy the power it has given you – always having the melody in the band arrangement and being heard above everyone else. You’re not quite ready to give that up just yet. You appreciate attention and are always invited to too many parties to keep up with you.

What university did you go to: Definitely Oxford or Cambridge

Saxophone

Let’s cut to the chase: if you played the saxophone, you were a bad bitch. And you still are. The Lisa Simpsons of the year who slipped in high school, if someone annoyed you, you just hit them over the head with your huge instrument case. The instrument’s gleaming gold has never ceased to impress, and it gives you a sense of validation you’ll never be able to forget. You didn’t have to be good at anything else because you were automatically better than everyone around you. Everyone wanted to be you, but no one could – and that remains true today. You are the CEO of your company and have at least four hustles. Get it queen.

What university did you go to: Newcastle

Clarinet

Clarinet players were neglected. Often a little corny, you knew your strengths and stuck to them. You don’t care about sports or being the most popular person of the year. All you needed to make you happy was your daily ham sandwich for lunch and the crate full of wood and metal that brought you so much joy.

Nowadays, you are there, you live for yourself, you don’t need anyone or anything else. You make yourself happy and, let’s face it, you probably still cuddle your clarinet to sleep at night. The emotional bond you share with this thing can never be severed.

What university did you go to: liverpool

Strings

If you play a stringed instrument, you fall into one of two categories: either you’re incredibly talented and should audition for BBC Young Musician of the Year, or you’re completely nuts and need some a reality check. String instruments are like the cooking pot, some people like them – most people don’t.

They make you want to smack your head in a car door every time a 10 year old picks up a violin because you know you’re going to have one of the 10 worst experiences of your life. These days, you’re probably working for a nonprofit and preaching love to the world while secretly throwing away your bag of chips because you’re too lazy to find a trash can. We see you.

What university did you go to: york

Other reed instruments

No need to beat around the bush, if you played another instrument in the woodwind category, it was probably because your music teacher forced you to, who needed someone to fill the gap in the band . You were shy, easy to walk, and you still are. Cultivate a pair and start being the boss of your own life.

Either that or you were the pissed off kid who played the oboe just to be different. If that was you, then these days you undoubtedly value appearances too much and find all your validation in materials.

What university did you go to: Exeter or Manchester

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The Indian Shehnai, the musical instrument made famous by Ustad Bismillah Khan, is seeking a GI tag https://clay-wood-winds.com/the-indian-shehnai-the-musical-instrument-made-famous-by-ustad-bismillah-khan-is-seeking-a-gi-tag/ Wed, 06 Jul 2022 05:18:00 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/the-indian-shehnai-the-musical-instrument-made-famous-by-ustad-bismillah-khan-is-seeking-a-gi-tag/ A request has been filed, requesting Geographical indication (GI) certification label for shehnaia musical instrument carried to its zenith by the famous musician from Kashi, Ustad Bismillah Khan. The IG application was filed on Tuesday by a Varanasi-based cultural organization, Bharat Ratna Ustad Bismillah Khan Foundation, with the support of Padma Shri Laureate, Dr. Rajani […]]]>
A request has been filed, requesting Geographical indication (GI) certification label for shehnaia musical instrument carried to its zenith by the famous musician from Kashi, Ustad Bismillah Khan.



The IG application was filed on Tuesday by a Varanasi-based cultural organization, Bharat Ratna Ustad Bismillah Khan Foundation, with the support of Padma Shri Laureate, Dr. Rajani Kanto of Human Welfare Association, also known as India’s ‘GI Man’ for his proactive role in filing over 125 GI applications across the country.

The Bharat Ratna Ustad Bismillah Khan Foundation, which is a cultural society created in 2009, is managed by its managing director, Syed Abbas Murtaza Shamsi.

“Shehnai and Varanasi are synonymous with city. It was the Ustad who raised the shehnai from the ignominy of an obscure wind instrument played at weddings to an ideal medium of classical music,” said Dr. Rajani Kant, adding that Varanasi is associated with this instrument for years and continues to produce some of the finest players of the instrument.

According to him, the application was filed at the GI Registry in Chennai.

“More than anyone, Ustad Bismillah Khan was solely responsible for popularizing the shehnai as a concert instrument, both nationally and internationally,” he said.

The shehnai is made of wood, with a double reed at one end and a flared metal bell at the other end. Its sound creates and maintains a sense of auspiciousness and holiness and hence is widely used at weddings and in temples.

“Making shehnai falls under the category of handicrafts, and there are around 60 to 70 artisans engaged in this craft in Varanasi,” said Kant, who is instrumental in obtaining GI tags for the most of the goods in Varanasi and neighboring districts.

According to records, Varanasi region in eastern UP has 16 products labeled GI, including Banaras brocade and sarees, Bhadohi handmade rug, Banaras Gulabi Meenakari handicrafts, lacquerware and wooden toys from Varanasi, black pottery from Nizamabad, metal regrowth crafts from Benares, glass from Varanasi. Beads, Ghazipur Wall Hanging, Varanasi Soft Stone Jali Work, Chunar Balua Patthar, Chunar Glazed Pottery, Benares Zardozi, Mirzapur Pital Bartan, Benares Wood Carving, Benares Hand Printed and Mau Saree.

“The GI label carries an assurance of quality and distinctiveness that is essentially attributable to the fact of its origin in that geographical locality, region or country,” Kant said.

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Inflation forces Indian businesses to borrow more – bad news when interest rates are high

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Onsite with Tiny Desert Concerts: Musical Instrument Museum https://clay-wood-winds.com/onsite-with-tiny-desert-concerts-musical-instrument-museum/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 18:03:08 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/onsite-with-tiny-desert-concerts-musical-instrument-museum/ Amber Victoria Singer / KJZZ The Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix. Arouna Diarra, twelfth-generation West African musician played a little concert in the desert at the Musical Instrument Museum (MIM) in Phoenix. Here is some additional information about the museum’s multi-sensory experience. At first glance, the Musical Instrument Museum simply houses an impressive collection of […]]]>

Amber Victoria Singer / KJZZ

The Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix.

Arouna Diarra, twelfth-generation West African musician played a little concert in the desert at the Musical Instrument Museum (MIM) in Phoenix. Here is some additional information about the museum’s multi-sensory experience.

At first glance, the Musical Instrument Museum simply houses an impressive collection of musical instruments from around the world. But slip on a pair of headphones and the place takes you – and your ears – around the world.

the stick, a guitar/bass hybrid

Amber Victoria Singer / KJZZ

“The Stick”, a guitar/bass hybrid.

Hundreds of sites around the museum have hidden IDs that automatically connect to receivers attached to headphones provided by MIM, allowing guests to actually hear the instruments in each exhibit in their original context.

As you make your way through each room, sounds of familiar and unfamiliar instruments – a moodswinger from the Netherlands, an Austrian oboe, something called “the stick”, which sounds like a guitar/ bass – fade. .

With a collection of over 8,000 instruments and over 5,000 on display, you won’t hear every instrument. But you can make up for that by trying a few.

You are invited to pinch, kick and scratch in the experience gallery at the bottom.

On a recent weekday afternoon in the gallery, a young boy beat two gongs in rhythm as a father waved his hands above a theremin – an electronic instrument controlled by manipulating electromagnetic fields with his hands. It almost sounded like the weirdest band in the world was getting ready for an amazing set.

Alongside the gongs and the theremin; harps, ukuleles, guitars, drums and other instruments are available for museum visitors of all ages. There are even two n’gonis by Arouna Diarra, presented this month in KJZZ’s Tiny Desert Concerts.

But not all of the museum’s instruments depend on humans.

In the mechanical music gallery, all of the featured instruments play themselves.

A spooky face-covered doll sticks its tongue out and wiggles its eyebrows, a violin is played with electromagnetic pulses – but the star of the gallery is clearly ‘Apollonia’, a massive orchestrion that takes up the entire back wall.

Apollonia the orchestra

Amber Victoria Singer / KJZZ

“Apollonia” the orchestra.

Popular in Europe from the late 1800s through the 1960s, orchestrions were large machines designed to play music like a band or orchestra. Apollonia weighs over two tons and includes two accordions, two saxophones, keyboard, flutes and drums. Every day at noon and 3 p.m. you have the opportunity to hear the huge, almost century-old orchestrion perform. Using a computer, a museum employee will choose from hundreds of songs for the orchestra to play. Guests are encouraged to dance to loud music.

The grand piano-inspired rotunda leading to the artists' gallery of the <a class=Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix.”/>

Amber Victoria Singer / KJZZ

The grand piano-inspired rotunda leading to the artists’ gallery of the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix.

The Artist Gallery features instruments, costumes, awards, and other memorabilia from famous musicians from around the world.

Where else would a grammy, an Olympic drum and a lyric sheet for Roy Orbison’s “Pretty Woman” all be in the same room?

Even the architecture of the museum is linked to music.

The curve of the rotunda leading to the artist’s gallery is inspired by the shape of a grand piano, and the windows are grouped in a pattern similar to piano keys.

Other aspects of the 200,000 square foot building are inspired by the desert topography of the Southwest, such as the winding “El Rio” hallway upstairs.

Even as you walk into the parking lot, you can still hear the faint sounds of a xylophone coming out of the experience gallery.

Not a bad way to spend a summer day in Phoenix.

a phoenix pride sign at the musical instruments museum

Amber Victoria Singer / KJZZ

A sign of Phoenix pride at the Musical Instrument Museum.

More KJZZ Stories

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What if Neanderthals created the world’s first musical instrument? | by Erik Brown | June 2022 https://clay-wood-winds.com/what-if-neanderthals-created-the-worlds-first-musical-instrument-by-erik-brown-june-2022/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/what-if-neanderthals-created-the-worlds-first-musical-instrument-by-erik-brown-june-2022/ Fifty-Thousand-Year-Old Bone Flute Changes An Ancestor’s Perception And Explains Why Music Is A Powerful Force Neanderthal Flute — By Tomaž Lauko Via National Museum of Slovenia Website “Music is the only thing in this crazy world that makes sense to me.” — Matisyahu, When the smoke clears JThe lyric of the song above is much […]]]>

Fifty-Thousand-Year-Old Bone Flute Changes An Ancestor’s Perception And Explains Why Music Is A Powerful Force

Neanderthal Flute — By Tomaž Lauko Via National Museum of Slovenia Website

“Music is the only thing in this crazy world that makes sense to me.”

— Matisyahu, When the smoke clears

JJThe lyric of the song above is much more than a lyric. This is perhaps the only universal truth for humanity. Every person – regardless of creed, color, shape or flag – has their soundtrack. Music is more than just fun. He animates us, explains us and gives a personal message that resonates in everyone.

He is so representative of our species that NASA even chose him as an interstellar ambassador. In fact, a sample of earth music journey inside the Voyager space probe. There is nothing more fitting when you think about it.

But how does something become so ingrained in a species like ours? Well, you could say that music has evolved with us. But technically, it may have evolved before us; it’s so old.

A team of archaeologists and scientists believe it started with a cousin of modern humans.

In a cave in Slovenia, an interesting bone was discovered. It was intentionally worked. Carefully drilled holes are easy to manipulate with your fingers. With a little imagination and a push of air, it generates sound.

It looks like a simple device, but it creates this all-powerful cement of music that binds all of humanity together. However, it is not ours. Neanderthals probably created this bone flute fifty to sixty thousand years ago.

If true, it’s a monumental overhaul of the mental capacity and culture of extinct modern humans. But before you can consider that, the artifact itself is an interesting story.

“Given the archaeological context and age, the find, if confirmed as an artifact (i.e. a musical instrument), would represent a find of exceptional significance. This would provide strong evidence that Neanderthals were capable of musical expression.

Journal of Experimental Archeology, Matija Turk and Giuliano Bastiani

According to National Museum of Slovenia, the bone flute was discovered by Ivan Turk’s team in 1995 in the cave of Divje babe, not far from Cerkno. It was originally a den for cave bears. This is all too apt as the instrument is made from the femur of a juvenile cave bear itself.

Matija Turk and Giuliano Bastiani article in the Journal of Experimental Archeology (Exarc) also say that the flute was found near a hearth. The original radiocarbon dating gave it an age in the forty thousand year range. However, Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating added anywhere from ten to twenty thousand years to that.

Divje Babe Cave — By Thilo Parg Going through Wikimedia Commons License: CC BY-SA 3.0

This dating, and the collection of stone and bone tools at the sediment level, places the flute in the time of the Neanderthals.

Turk and his colleagues immediately noticed two punched holes in the center and two more partial holes, also towards the central part of the artifact. They didn’t look like random marks. It has been modified.

Clearly, such a startling finding sparked controversy.

Only modern humans were thought to be capable of such creativity, not Neanderthals. Also, the “flute” could just be a bone chewed by a random carnivore, the human mind could create the appearance of something bigger.

Giuliano Bastiani and Turk decided to use experimental archeology to examine their hypothesis of the man-made artifact. It is a branch of archeology that tries to reproduce the past through physical experiments, instead of simply examining and inferring.

In their Exarch article, the authors refer to an experiment where they obtained skulls of cave bears, hyenas and wolves, by making dental casts. They used them to puncture a mixture of about 30 juvenile and adult bear femurs provided by the hunters. They immediately noticed some problems.

  • Wolf and hyena teeth didn’t match the marks on the bones at all
  • Cave bear canines matched better, which makes more sense as they were plentiful in the area
  • Although the cave bear tooth, jaw shape and bite pressure created its own problems

For the cave bear to make the line marks, the bone should come straight out of its mouth, like a cigar. Its teeth must also continuously strike the same places. Additionally, the impact damage to the bones did not match that caused by the modeled dental casting.

Finally, the compressive forces required for a jawbone to puncture the bone also fractured the test bones, sometimes pulling them apart. Although there was a fracture on the bone flute, scans showed it was superficial, indicating it occurred after the hole was made.

Although the team proved that making the artifact out of animal teeth was virtually impossible, there were still problems convincing members of the scientific community that it was intentionally created by a hominid. Experimental archeology helped here too.

Bastiani and Turk note that many sharp stone tools and blunt bone tools have been found on similar sediment layers with the flute. However, microscopic analysis did not show consistency with “conventional maker’s marks (i.e. stone tool ridges and cut marks)”. But the animals didn’t succeed either.

Something must have been missing on the exam.

Bastiani took replicated stone tools like those found in the sediments and pierced a bone through a method that mixed both chiseling and drilling. Half of his attempts showed no cut marks – very similar to the artifact.

He proved that holes could be inserted into bone without the traditional microscopic signs of tooling.

Another archaeologist, FZ Horusitzky, later duplicated the exact markings on the artifact, with no manufacturing marks or cuts. He used a sharp stone tool to punch punctures in the bone, then a blunt bone tool with a wooden hammer to punch a hole. Besides, he could do it quickly.

While this showed that the artifact could be man-made – or in this case, made by Neanderthal man – could it function as a flute?

“On the reconstructed instrument, it was possible to perform a series of articulations and musical ornamentations such as legato, staccato, double and triple tonguing, flutter-tonguing, glissando, chromatic scales, trills, broken chords, leaps of d interval and melodic successions from the lowest to the highest tones.

Journal of Experimental Archeology, Matija Turk and Giuliano Bastiani

Album made with a replica of the Neanderthal bone flute —By Ljuben Dimkaroski, A sound from the past

Miran Pflaum du National Museum of Slovenia in a documentary about the flute explains that it was copied in a scanner. Since it was so well preserved, they were able to see what parts were missing and recreated the device with a 3D printer. Musicians and scientists later experimented with it.

Musician Ljuben Dimkaroski turned the device upside down and found a beveled edge that he could use as a mouthpiece. Soon he was play musical scales (do-re-me-fa, etc.) with the flute, eventually creating his own album (above), which is sold at the museum.

Replica of the Neanderthal flute — By Žiga Going through Wikimedia Commons

teacher and musician Bostjan Gombac says the device is capable of 2.5 octaves and can play many classical compositions with it. In fact, he even created his own trippy symphony, demonstrating the wide range of the device. He also thinks it could have been used to imitate birds or animals.

Although the reproduced artifact may mesmerize us with sounds from the distant past, it leaves us with a far greater realization. Namely, are our impressions of Neanderthals completely wrong? Could they really be the creators of the mighty force humanity calls music?

The science website IFLsciencerecently published a article explaining that the first hand axes in Britain were not created by Homo Sapiens. It turns out that Neanderthals didn’t create them either. The distant ancestors of the Neanderthals created these six hundred thousand year old flint axes.

While we may be tempted to think of pre-modern humans as hairless apes in appearance and mentality; they were much more than that. Our distant cousins ​​were prolific creators. Thus, our apple does not fall far from the tree.

Likewise, this innate attraction to music, which every Homo Sapien shares, has a distant root. It is much older than anyone could have imagined. Nearly sixty thousand years ago, a humanoid creature like us noticed that noise could be generated with punctured bones.

As creators, they made their own instrument and created a series of coordinated sounds that Plato would later call a “soul lifter.” They and us would never be the same again.

If true, this discovery proves to us that Neanderthals were not the stereotype we attribute to them. They were able to express themselves through music. Plus, music is such a part of modern humanity because it’s older than us—created by distant cousins.

Keep that in mind the next time you find yourself lost in a song. This place where you travel in your mind has been a home for mankind since the time of the Neanderthals. In fact, we have them to thank.

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The surprising musical instrument parents want children to learn https://clay-wood-winds.com/the-surprising-musical-instrument-parents-want-children-to-learn/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/the-surprising-musical-instrument-parents-want-children-to-learn/ The idea of ​​listening to out of tune chords may not sound ideal. But, contrary to popular belief, most parents want their children to learn a musical instrument. A new study conducted by OnePoll on behalf of guitar center surveyed 2,000 Americans about their music choices for their children – with surprising results. The survey […]]]>

The idea of ​​listening to out of tune chords may not sound ideal. But, contrary to popular belief, most parents want their children to learn a musical instrument.

A new study conducted by OnePoll on behalf of guitar center surveyed 2,000 Americans about their music choices for their children – with surprising results.

The survey revealed that 82% of parents think it is important for their child to learn to play an instrument, even if the recorder was not their first choice.

The instrument that 18% of parents most want to hear at home is the piano.

However, the surprising #2 choice, according to 17% of respondents, is – drum roll, please – the dulcet tones of the drum, followed closely by the violin (16%).

It’s true: one in six parents want their children to learn to play the drums.

When it comes to what kids themselves want, it’s a potentially explosive choice: the most popular instrument is the electric guitar, according to 22% of parents surveyed.

Most parents wanted their children to receive a musical education.
guitar center

More than half – 1,200 – of parents surveyed said they had played at least one instrument in their lifetime.

The survey found that one in four Americans can play an instrument – with 17% picking up old musical habits during the coronavirus pandemic and 37% saying they had learned an instrument in the past but don’t play currently nothing.

A quarter of respondents said they had never learned an instrument and only 9% of parents said their children had not yet shown interest in learning an instrument.

In addition, 26% believe that music education should be encouraged at school and 29% believe that it should be compulsory or a priority at school.

Top 10 most popular instruments

  • Piano/keyboard: 27%
  • Acoustic guitar: 20%
  • Violin: 19%
  • Electric guitar: 18%
  • Battery: 18%
  • Voice/singing: 18%
  • Saxophone: 17%
  • DJ gear: 16%
  • Trumpet: 16%
  • Low: 16%

Top 10 Instruments Parents Want Their Kids To Learn

  • Piano/keyboard: 18%
  • Battery: 17%
  • Violin: 16%
  • Electric guitar: 15%
  • Acoustic guitar: 14%
  • Trumpet: 14%
  • Flute: 13%
  • Percussion: 13%
  • Voice/singing: 13%
  • Saxophone: 13%
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Return of musical instruments with the Rochester Jazz Fest https://clay-wood-winds.com/return-of-musical-instruments-with-the-rochester-jazz-fest/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 13:16:03 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/return-of-musical-instruments-with-the-rochester-jazz-fest/ ROCHESTER, NY (WROC) – At Rochester Jazz Fest this weekend, you’ll have the opportunity to give back while listening to music. For the 14th year, the festival is holding a musical instrument drive for students in the Rochester City School District. Instruments in the classroom have always been in demand, says Amy Stein, executive director […]]]>

ROCHESTER, NY (WROC) – At Rochester Jazz Fest this weekend, you’ll have the opportunity to give back while listening to music.

For the 14th year, the festival is holding a musical instrument drive for students in the Rochester City School District.

Instruments in the classroom have always been in demand, says Amy Stein, executive director of the Rochester Education Foundation.

“We need things like cork grease, reeds and strings and also supplies to help clean the instruments,” she said.

That’s why the foundation is partnering with the CGI Rochester International Jazz Festival and M&T Bank to help cut expenses. They will collect your used musical items during the festival, for the Rochester City School District.

The festival runs from June 17 to 25. The Donation Booth is in the Merchandise Tent on Plot 5 from 5-8pm during the festival.

“I think any opportunity to be in person is fantastic,” Stein said of her comeback after a two-year hiatus.

“But especially when it’s an opportunity to help a child,” Stein said. “You can go there, listen to jazz, participate in a fantastic community event and you can help someone.”

They ask for all used and playable instruments.

Daniel Burns, president of the Rochester Regional M&T Bank says trumpets, trombones and flutes are examples of what’s in demand.

“You can just show up, and we’ll gladly get rid of it,” he said. No appointment is necessary.

Stein says Rochester has always been a musical community.

And every year, people continue to mobilize.

“We love talking to people, hearing the stories about these instruments that have been collected,” he said.

“So for them to have the opportunity to learn to play, it’s not just in school, it’s outside; something they can keep forever,” Stein said.

The two say they have collected more than 3,500 instruments over the years. To get a complete idea of ​​what they are looking for, head to this link.

Important to note – the player does not support piano, organs, drums or accordions.

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Jazz Fest Musical Instrument Player Returns for 13th Year https://clay-wood-winds.com/jazz-fest-musical-instrument-player-returns-for-13th-year/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 16:32:55 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/jazz-fest-musical-instrument-player-returns-for-13th-year/ ROCHESTER, NY (WROC) – The 19th annual CGI Rochester International Jazz Festival kicks off June 17, and a long-running donation campaign is back. M&T Bank and the Rochester Education Foundation (REF) are teaming up again to collect musical instruments for local students during the festival for the 13th year. Rochester Jazz Festival lineup: Find out […]]]>

ROCHESTER, NY (WROC) – The 19th annual CGI Rochester International Jazz Festival kicks off June 17, and a long-running donation campaign is back.

M&T Bank and the Rochester Education Foundation (REF) are teaming up again to collect musical instruments for local students during the festival for the 13th year.

There will be an M&T booth at the festival that will serve as a drop-off site for musical instruments and outreach for REF’s year-round efforts to super students in the Rochester City School District.

Throughout Jazz Fest, the donation kiosk will be open from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. to collect instruments. It will be located inside the Merchandise Tent at Plot 5 in Downtown Rochester.

REF accepts instruments for students of all ages and skill levels and accepts everything from recorders and string instruments to brass, woodwind and percussion.

Officials say the greatest need is for trumpets, alto saxophones and orchestral strings like violins, violas and cellos. They say music supplies, like stands, amps, sound equipment, guitar strings, and drumsticks are also welcome and appreciated.

“After two difficult years, the return of the Jazz Festival is a time of celebration and an opportunity to come together again to uplift our community. I believe our city cares so much about the arts because many of us have had the opportunity to explore our own talents in music and other art forms. This is something every student deserves and our community should generously support,” said M&T Bank Rochester Regional President Dan Burns. “I am grateful for REF’s incredible work in leading this campaign and helping local children access educational opportunities. If you have an unused instrument at home, give it new life and help us get it into the hands of a child in need.

“REF is grateful to M&T Bank for their generous support of our Music and Arts for All program. Because of M&T Bank’s annual donation of its booth to the Jazz Festival, as well as the wonderful M&T volunteers who help look after it, REF has collected instruments from hundreds of festival goers. These instruments meant a lot to the students who were able to experience the joy of learning to play an instrument,” said REF Executive Director Amy Stein.

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