Musical instrument shop – Clay Wood Winds http://clay-wood-winds.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 20:10:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://clay-wood-winds.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Musical instrument shop – Clay Wood Winds http://clay-wood-winds.com/ 32 32 Virginians win $489 million in payday loan settlement – ​​Daily Press https://clay-wood-winds.com/virginians-win-489-million-in-payday-loan-settlement-daily-press/ Tue, 17 May 2022 20:10:54 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/virginians-win-489-million-in-payday-loan-settlement-daily-press/ Online payday loan companies that charged up to 919% interest will spend $489 million to repay some 555,000 borrowers, to settle a class action lawsuit brought by eight Virginians. The lawsuit alleged that Golden Valley Lending; Silver Cloud Financial, Inc.; Mountain Summit Financial, Inc.; and Majestic Lake Financial, Inc., all formed under the laws of […]]]>

Online payday loan companies that charged up to 919% interest will spend $489 million to repay some 555,000 borrowers, to settle a class action lawsuit brought by eight Virginians.

The lawsuit alleged that Golden Valley Lending; Silver Cloud Financial, Inc.; Mountain Summit Financial, Inc.; and Majestic Lake Financial, Inc., all formed under the laws of the Habematolel Pomo Tribe of the Upper Lake Tribe in California, violated federal racketeering laws as well as Virginia’s usury and credit licensing laws to consumption.

He also leveled the same charges against three Kansas City, Missouri businessmen whose companies processed the loans, provided the capital the tribal corporations used to make the loans, and collected the bulk of the profits from the company.

Companies advertised online loans of up to $1,000 with the promise that borrowers could be approved in seconds. according to the lawsuit prepared by Consumer Litigation Associates based in Newport News, the Virginia Poverty Law Center and the law firm Kelly Guzzo in Fairfax.

One of the Virginians who sued, George Hengle, paid a total of $1,127 on three loans, with interest rates of 636%, 722% and 763%. Another, Steven Pike, paid $1,725 ​​on his loan with an interest rate of 744%, while Elwood Bumbray paid $1,561 on a loan with an interest rate of 543% and Lawrence Mwethuku paid $499.50 on a loan with an interest rate of 919%.

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Under the terms of the settlement, Tribal Businesses will forgive $450 million in balances owing on their loans. The businessmen will pay $39 million, which will be distributed to the borrowers as compensation.

Borrowers in Virginia, along with those in 21 other states, will get back any money they paid to lenders that exceeded their loan principal amount.

Borrowers in 26 other states will receive the difference between their state’s statutory interest rates and the interest they paid on their loans. Nevada and Utah borrowers will not receive any refunds; Utah has no formal cap on payday loan rates, and Nevada’s cap limits interest on payday loans to 25% of the borrower’s gross monthly income.

Virginia law caps loan rates at 12% unless a business obtains a consumer credit license. For these companies, the General Assembly capped rates at 36%, after years of daily press reports of high-interest loans.

The two law firms and the Poverty Law Center that filed the lawsuit have filed several others against payday and online lenders over the years, including one settled for $433 million in 2019.

The poverty law center also operates a helpline where borrowers can call for help at 866-830-4501.

Dave Ress, 757-247-4535, dress@dailypress.com

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10 Ways To Stay Motivated While Paying Off Debt According To PaydayChampion’s Mirek Saunders – CONAN Daily https://clay-wood-winds.com/10-ways-to-stay-motivated-while-paying-off-debt-according-to-paydaychampions-mirek-saunders-conan-daily/ Sat, 14 May 2022 01:41:02 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/10-ways-to-stay-motivated-while-paying-off-debt-according-to-paydaychampions-mirek-saunders-conan-daily/ When you’re trying to pay off your debt, it can be hard to stay motivated. Especially if you’ve been struggling with it for a while. But don’t worry, because you are not alone. Thousands of people are in the same situation as you, and many of them have found ways to stay motivated and continue […]]]>

When you’re trying to pay off your debt, it can be hard to stay motivated. Especially if you’ve been struggling with it for a while. But don’t worry, because you are not alone. Thousands of people are in the same situation as you, and many of them have found ways to stay motivated and continue their journey to debt freedom.

In this blog post, Mirek Saunders from PaydayChampion, a well-established online loan referral service, shares 10 tips and tricks from experienced payday loan borrowers who successfully repaid their debts. These tips are for those who want to achieve financial freedom.

wads of dollar bills (©Celyn Kang)
  1. Make a plan.

Know what you need to do and when you need to do it. This will help keep you accountable and on track.

2. start small.

It can be overwhelming to think about paying off all your debts at once. So start with a loan or credit card balance and work your way up from there.

3. Define aims.

Both short term and long term. Having something to do will help you stay motivated even on days when you feel like you’re not making progress.

4. Find a support system.

Whether it’s friends, family, or an online community of people in the same situation as you, having someone to talk to and lean on can make all the difference.

5. Talk about your debt-free journey.

Sharing your experience and accomplishments with others will help you stay on track and stay motivated. It can also be a great way to inspire others who are striving to become debt free themselves.

6. Reward yourself.

Every time you hit a goal, give yourself a pat on the back (and maybe even a little treat!). This will help reinforce positive behavior and remind you that being debt-free is worth all the effort.

7. Keep a debt-free journal.

Document your journey so you can come back to it later and see how far you’ve come. It can be a great motivator when you’re feeling down about your progress.

8. Get inspired by the stories of others.

There are many people who have been in your shoes and come out of it debt-free. Reading or listening to their stories can give you the hope and motivation you need to keep going.

9. Visualize your goal.

Close your eyes and imagine what life will be like once you are finally debt free. What will you do with all that extra cash? How will it feel to not have the weight of debt hanging over your head?

ten. Remember why you do this.

It’s easy to lose sight of your goals when the going gets tough. But if you can remember why it’s important for you to be debt free, it will be that much easier for you to keep going.

.

If you’re struggling with payday loan debt, you’re not alone. Millions of Americans are in the same boat, and many of them have managed to pay off their debts. Use these tips and tricks from experienced debtors to help you stay motivated on your own journey to debt freedom. With hard work and dedication, you can accomplish anything.

It will be very helpful to find someone to hold you accountable, such as a financial adviser or even a friend.

Taking loans without a credit check is probably not a good idea right now. You need someone who will help hold you accountable, it will be a lot easier to stay on track and motivated while you pay down your debt. A financial advisor can help you develop a budget and payment plan tailored to your particular situation. And having a friend or family member to talk to can make all the difference in feeling motivated to pay off debt.

So reach out to your support network and find someone who can help you stay accountable on your journey to debt freedom. It will make all the difference in helping you stay motivated and on track.

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Cash advance: what is it and should you get one? https://clay-wood-winds.com/cash-advance-what-is-it-and-should-you-get-one/ Wed, 11 May 2022 22:52:00 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/cash-advance-what-is-it-and-should-you-get-one/ petekarici/Getty Images Difficult financial situations happen from time to time for most people. When this happens, it’s not always obvious where to turn for help. In these situations, however, a cash advance can be an attractive option because it is faster and easier to obtain than other options. Depending on the severity of the circumstances, […]]]>

petekarici/Getty Images

Difficult financial situations happen from time to time for most people. When this happens, it’s not always obvious where to turn for help. In these situations, however, a cash advance can be an attractive option because it is faster and easier to obtain than other options.

Depending on the severity of the circumstances, you may not have the time and energy to consider options that take longer and involve more paperwork.

But despite their benefits, cash advances can also come with significant costs. Therefore, it is important to understand what cash advances are and how much they could cost you. It is also important to know the alternatives available to you in case of need.

What is a cash advance?

A cash advance is a short-term loan offered by a bank or other financial institution, often with very high interest and fees. But the trade-off is that they allow borrowers to easily access the funds they need, faster than other types of loans.

When people think of cash advances, they often think of credit card cash advances. It’s one of the most common types of cash advances, but it’s not the only one.

However, the cost of using a cash advance can be high and can lead to an endless cycle of interest accrual. Therefore, it is important to understand how they work and all the parts that are involved.

Types of cash advances

“Cash advance” always refers to a form of borrowing, but there is not just one type of cash advance. There are a few common types, but how each works is different.

Credit card cash advances

Credit card cash advances are the most common type of cash advance and involve borrowing up to a cash advance limit on your account. Note that with this method there is a cash advance limit, and this limit is usually less than your purchase limit. The cash advance limit is usually only a fraction of your credit limit.

Additionally, the APR for credit card cash advances is often several percentage points higher than the APR for purchases and balance transfers. To complicate matters further, there is no grace period for credit card cash advances.

There is a grace period that requires card issuers not to charge interest for at least 21 days after the payment due date. However, cash advances don’t have that luxury and will start earning interest immediately after you receive your money.

Payday loans

Payday loans provide small cash advances to individuals that must be repaid on the borrower’s next payday. These loans generally require proof of income such as a pay stub to show that the borrower is able to repay the loan. However, payday loans can also use other sources of income to cover the balance.

Payday loans are short-term loans, usually for small amounts; it’s not uncommon for a payday loan to be for $100. Nevertheless, their high interest rates can make payday loans a very expensive way to borrow.

For example, the borrower might have to pay a fee of $20 to borrow $100. $20 sounds like a small fee, but as a percentage, it’s 20% of the principle, which is high. But payday loans usually have a repayment period of 14 days. So, if this 20% interest charge is annualized, it equates to over 500% APR.

To make matters worse, some states allow payday loans to be renewed. In this case, any amount that the borrower cannot repay by his next payday can be turned into a new loan. Additionally, there may be interest charges, late fees, and other charges payable. And it’s all on top of our previously mentioned 500% APR.

Cash Advances to Merchants

Merchant cash advances are a way for businesses to get the funds they need. Merchant cash advances use past sales or future sales projections to determine the amount of the advance. This is similar to the pay stub requirement for payday loans. Merchant cash advances are a relatively easy way for small businesses to access the cash they need, as the whole process often only takes a few days.

How does a cash advance work?

When you take out a cash advance, you are borrowing an amount that will be subject to interest and fees associated with the advance. There may be additional charges, such as cash advance fees. Additionally, cash advances such as credit card cash advances often come with a higher APR than other types of transactions.

Depending on the type of cash advance, you may have a few different options for taking out a cash advance.

Try these methods:

  • In line. Your card issuer may allow you to request a cash advance through their website or mobile app, so you don’t have to travel to request an advance.
  • In person. If you have a bank-issued credit card, you can take the card there and ask for a cash advance.
  • At an ATM. You may be able to request a cash advance at your bank’s ATM. However, as with most ATM transactions, you will need a PIN to be able to request a cash advance in this way. If you don’t have a PIN, you can request one; however, your bank may not be able to provide you with one immediately. Therefore, you may have to wait a few days for your PIN.
  • By convenience check. Your bank may offer convenience checks that you can issue or the amount you need as an advance.

Costs and fees

There are a few costs and fees to consider if you’re considering a cash advance. Depending on the terms of the advance, these fees can be significant. Therefore, you should be aware of all the implications before applying for one.

For credit card cash advances, for example, cash advances may have a higher APR than balance transfers and purchases. Then, in addition to the higher APR, you will have to pay a separate cash advance fee.

Cash advance fees are typically 3% to 5% of the cash advance amount. So a $500 cash advance would incur a fee of $15 to $25, on average.

There are also other fees you might encounter. For example, if you request a cash advance at an ATM, fees may apply. It could also be the money if you request a cash advance in a foreign currency, which could incur additional charges.

Cash Advance FAQs

Here are the answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about cash advances.

  • Is a cash advance hurting your credit?
    • Asking for a cash advance will not necessarily hurt your credit. However, it will increase your credit utilization, which could hurt your credit if it pushes your utilization too high. As a general rule, you should try to keep your credit utilization below 30%.
  • What is an example of a cash advance?
    • The most common form of cash advance is a credit card cash advance. With this type, you ask your card issuer to extend a cash advance to be repaid later. For example, you can request a $250 advance from your card issuer. Remember that there will be cash advance fees and most credit cards have a cash advance APR that is higher than the purchase APR.
  • Is an advance a loan?
    • Yes, a cash advance is a loan. Another term for this is a line of credit, which you might see used with your credit card. However, all these terms are just terms used to refer to different types of loans.

Our in-house research team and on-site financial experts work together to create accurate, unbiased and up-to-date content. We check every stat, quote and fact using trusted primary resources to ensure that the information we provide is correct. You can read more about GOBankingRates processes and standards in our Editorial Policy.

About the Author

Bob Haegele is a personal finance writer specializing in topics such as investing, banking, credit cards, and real estate. His work has been featured on The Ladders, The Good Men Project and Small Biz Daily. He also co-runs Modest Money and is a dog sitter and walker.

]]> What are the different types of personal loans? https://clay-wood-winds.com/what-are-the-different-types-of-personal-loans/ Tue, 10 May 2022 15:50:08 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/what-are-the-different-types-of-personal-loans/ No one wants to be in a position where they have to rely on a loan to help them out financially, but we all have to accept that we may end up in that position eventually. Personal loans are one of the most common types of loans that people end up taking out at some […]]]>


No one wants to be in a position where they have to rely on a loan to help them out financially, but we all have to accept that we may end up in that position eventually.

Personal loans are one of the most common types of loans that people end up taking out at some point in their lives, and the reason is that personal loans have no specific purpose.

While mortgages, car loans, student loans, etc. have very specific purposes, personal loans can be for almost anything…almost.

But there are also many different types of personal loans you can get too, and each type is better suited to a person for different reasons. So before you go hunting installment loans in lexingtonlet’s take a look at the types of personal loans.

Explain personal loans

Personal loans are a type of installment loan, which means that you repay them in installments. This loan is given to you without even needing to use the money for anything specific.

Some lenders will allow you to check your offers online without affecting your credit score, but others will not, and when applying you should be aware that you will be required to disclose your personal and financial information and agree that they obtain firm credit. .

This can have a negative impact on your credit score, but only in a very minor and temporary way.

If you qualify, you will receive different offers and be able to repay over different periods, with different interest rates and payment rates.

The interest rates for these loans are usually fixed rate, and they will often remain fixed in monthly installments for the duration of the loan activity. You may also have to pay an administration or origination fee, and you will not get it back.

Should you avoid personal loans?

There are three particular types of personal loans that we recommend you avoid. These are payday loans, title loans and pledge loans.

Payday loans are short term and come with huge fees. They’re not always bad, especially if you’re money wise, but they tend to leave borrowers in a cycle of debt that often ends with taking out new loans to pay off old ones.

Title loans are easy, but you must use your car as collateral. Repayment terms can be short and interest rates high, this can add to the wear and tear on you in the long run, especially if you can’t afford it and find yourself at the end of a repossession.

Pawnbrokers can be a good alternative to payday loans, but you risk losing your items to the pawnbroker and you will often have to pay fees if you want to extend the repayment term.

What are the types of personal loans?

So, knowing all of the above, what are the different types of personal loans you can get?

Here are the main types of personal loans you are likely to come across.

Not guaranteed

Unsecured loans are loans that are not backed by collateral to protect the lender. Instead, they will usually have a higher cost in their interest rates, which means they may offer you a higher APR.

That being said, you are not putting any of your assets at risk by taking out an unsecured loan.

You will still be assessed on your credit score, income and debts, and you could get a rate of 6-36%.

Secure

Secured loans are the loans that are safe for a lender because you have to post collateral. This could be your house, car or other material possessions. This is often the case with mortgages and car loans.

If you are unable to repay the loan, your house/car may be repossessed.

Fixed rate

The majority of personal loans are fixed, which means the rate you pay and the monthly payments you make to repay the loan will remain the same for the life of the loan.

These fixed rate loans are great for keeping your monthly payments consistent on long-term loans.

Co-signed

Co-signed loans are best if you have bad credit and cannot qualify on your own.

Someone else will co-sign the loan, but they won’t have access to your funds. That person will still be in trouble if you don’t make the payments, though.

A person who is a co-signer will generally have great credit.

Floating rate

Variable rate loans are calibrated by banks, and depending on how it goes up and down, your loan will do the same. You will usually get a lower APR for this, and there will often be a cap on how much this can change over time.

They are not widely available, but are usually found on shorter term loans.

Debt Consolidation

Debt consolidation personal loans are actually a popular type of personal loan. This type of personal loan will take all of the loans you are currently paying off and consolidate them into one large lump sum.

This is ideal as it reduces the amount you have to pay. How?

Well, if you have multiple loans at different interest rates, it will cost you more in the long run, when you consolidate your loans into a personal debt consolidation loan, you only have one interest rate. interest with which you have to deal.

Credit line

Personal lines of credit are revolving credits, and they are much like a credit card, more than a personal loan. Instead of getting a lump sum of money, you will have access to a line of credit from which you can borrow as needed.

With this, you will only have to pay interest on the money you borrow

It works best when you need to borrow money for running costs or if you have an emergency.

This article does not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or management of EconoTimes

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ELEVATE CREDIT, INC. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (Form 10-Q) https://clay-wood-winds.com/elevate-credit-inc-managements-discussion-and-analysis-of-financial-condition-and-results-of-operations-form-10-q/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:34:06 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/elevate-credit-inc-managements-discussion-and-analysis-of-financial-condition-and-results-of-operations-form-10-q/ The following Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations ("MD&A") is intended to help the reader understand our business, our results of operations and our financial condition. The MD&A is provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related […]]]>
The following Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and
Results of Operations ("MD&A") is intended to help the reader understand our
business, our results of operations and our financial condition. The MD&A is
provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with our
unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes and
other financial information included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form
10-Q.

Some of the information contained in this discussion and analysis, including
information with respect to our plans and strategy for our business, includes
forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. You should
review the "Note About Forward-Looking Statements" section of this Quarterly
Report on Form 10-Q for a discussion of important factors that could cause
actual results to differ materially from the results described in or implied by
the forward-looking statements contained in the following discussion and
analysis. We generally refer to loans, customers and other information and data
associated with each of our brands (Rise, Elastic and Today Card) as Elevate's
loans, customers, information and data, irrespective of whether Elevate directly
originates the credit to the customer or whether such credit is originated by a
third party.

OVERVIEW

We provide online credit solutions to consumers in the US who are not
well-served by traditional bank products and who are looking for better options
than payday loans, title loans, pawn and storefront installment loans. Non-prime
consumers now represent a larger market than prime consumers but are riskier to
underwrite and serve with traditional approaches. We're succeeding at it - and
doing it responsibly - with best-in-class advanced technology and proprietary
risk analytics honed by serving more than 2.7 million customers with $10.0
billion in credit. Our current online credit products, Rise, Elastic and Today
Card, reflect our mission to provide customers with access to competitively
priced credit and services while helping them build a brighter financial future
with credit building and financial wellness features. We call this mission "Good
Today, Better Tomorrow."

We earn revenues on the Rise installment loans, on the Rise and Elastic lines of
credit and on the Today Card credit card product. Our revenue primarily consists
of finance charges and line of credit fees. Finance charges are driven by our
average loan balances outstanding and by the average annual percentage rate
("APR") associated with those outstanding loan balances. We calculate our
average loan balances by taking a simple daily average of the ending loan
balances outstanding for each period. Line of credit fees are recognized when
they are assessed and recorded to revenue over the life of the loan. We present
certain key metrics and other information on a "combined" basis to reflect
information related to loans originated by us and by our bank partners that
license our brands, Republic Bank, FinWise Bank and Capital Community Bank
("CCB"), as well as loans originated by third-party lenders pursuant to CSO
programs, which loans originated through CSO programs are not recorded on our
balance sheet in accordance with US GAAP. See "-Key Financial and Operating
Metrics" and "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures."

We use our working capital and our credit facility with Victory Park Management,
LLC ("VPC" and the "VPC Facility") to fund the loans we directly make to our
Rise customers. The VPC Facility has a maximum total borrowing amount available
of $200 million at March 31, 2022.

We also license our Rise installment loan brand to two banks. FinWise Bank
originates Rise installment loans in 17 states. This bank initially provides all
of the funding, retains 4% of the balances of all of the loans originated and
sells the remaining 96% loan participation in those Rise installment loans to a
third-party SPV, EF SPV, Ltd. ("EF SPV"). These loan participation purchases are
funded through a separate financing facility (the "EF SPV Facility"), and
through cash flows from operations generated by EF SPV. The EF SPV Facility has
a maximum total borrowing amount available of $250 million. We do not own EF
SPV, but we have a credit default protection agreement with EF SPV whereby we
provide credit protection to the investors in EF SPV against Rise loan losses in
return for a credit premium. As the primary beneficiary, Elevate is required to
consolidate EF SPV as a variable interest entity ("VIE") under US GAAP and the
condensed consolidated financial statements include revenue, losses and loans
receivable related to the 96% of the Rise installment loans originated by
FinWise Bank and sold to EF SPV.



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Beginning in the third quarter of 2020, we also license our Rise installment
loan brand to an additional bank, CCB, which originates Rise installment loans
in three different states than FinWise Bank. Similar to the relationship with
FinWise Bank, CCB initially provides all of the funding, retains 5% of the
balances of all of the loans originated and sells the remaining 95% loan
participation in those Rise installment loans to a third-party SPV, EC SPV, Ltd.
("EC SPV"). These loan participation purchases are funded through a separate
financing facility (the "EC SPV Facility"), and through cash flows from
operations generated by EC SPV. The EC SPV Facility has a maximum total
borrowing amount available of $100 million. We do not own EC SPV, but we have a
credit default protection agreement with EC SPV whereby we provide credit
protection to the investors in EC SPV against Rise loan losses in return for a
credit premium. As the primary beneficiary, Elevate is required to consolidate
EC SPV as a VIE under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial
statements include revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 95% of
the Rise installment loans originated by CCB and sold to EC SPV.

The Elastic line of credit product is originated by a third-party lender,
Republic Bank, which initially provides all of the funding for that product.
Republic Bank retains 10% of the balances of all loans originated and sells a
90% loan participation in the Elastic lines of credit. An SPV structure was
implemented such that the loan participations are sold by Republic Bank to
Elastic SPV, Ltd. ("Elastic SPV") and Elastic SPV receives its funding from VPC
in a separate financing facility (the "ESPV Facility"), which was finalized on
July 13, 2015. We do not own Elastic SPV, but we have a credit default
protection agreement with Elastic SPV whereby we provide credit protection to
the investors in Elastic SPV against Elastic loan losses in return for a credit
premium. Per the terms of this agreement, under US GAAP, we are the primary
beneficiary of Elastic SPV and are required to consolidate the financial results
of Elastic SPV as a VIE in our condensed consolidated financial statements. The
ESPV Facility has a maximum total borrowing amount available of $350 million at
March 31, 2022.

Today Card is a credit card product designed to meet the spending needs of
non-prime consumers by offering a prime customer experience. Today Card is
originated by CCB under the licensed MasterCard brand, and a 95% participation
interest in the credit card receivable is sold to us. These credit card
receivable purchases are funded through a separate financing facility (the "TSPV
Facility"), and through cash flows from operations generated by the Today Card
portfolio. The TSPV Facility has a maximum commitment amount of $50 million,
which may be increased up to $100 million. As the lowest APR product in our
portfolio, Today Card allows us to serve a broader spectrum of non-prime
Americans. The Today Card experienced significant growth in its portfolio size
despite the pandemic due to the success of our direct mail campaigns, the
primary marketing channel for acquiring new Today Card customers. We are
following a specific growth plan to grow the product while monitoring customer
responses and credit quality. Customer response to the Today Card is very
strong, as we continue to see extremely high response rates, high customer
engagement, and positive customer satisfaction scores.

In January 2022, we collaborated with Central Pacific Bank ("CPB") to invest in
the launch of a new fintech company, Swell Financial, Inc. ("Swell"). The Swell
App includes several groundbreaking features to help customers automatically
control their spending, tackle debt, and invest in exclusive private market
opportunities with as little as $1 thousand. We will help CPB and Swell offer
the Swell Credit line of credit product with APRs between 8% and 24%. Our
current total investment carrying value in Swell, using equity method
accounting, is $5.5 million and we have a non-controlling interest in Swell.

Our management evaluates our financial performance and our future strategic objectives using key indicators based primarily on the following three themes:


•Revenue growth.   Key metrics related to revenue growth that we monitor by
product include the ending and average combined loan balances outstanding, the
effective APR of our product loan portfolios, the total dollar value of loans
originated, the number of new customer loans made, the ending number of customer
loans outstanding and the related customer acquisition costs ("CAC") associated
with each new customer loan made. We include CAC as a key metric when analyzing
revenue growth (rather than as a key metric within margin expansion).

•Stable credit quality.   Since the time they were managing our legacy US
products, our management team has maintained stable credit quality across the
loan portfolio they were managing. Additionally, in the periods covered in this
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of
Operations, we have maintained our strong credit quality. With the adoption of
fair value for the loans receivable portfolio effective January 1, 2022, the
credit quality metrics we monitor include net charge-offs as a percentage of
revenues, change in fair value of loans receivable as a percentage of revenues,
the percentage of past due combined loans receivable - principal and net
principal charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans
receivable-principal. Prior to our adoption of fair value for the loans
receivable portfolio effective January 1, 2022, our credit quality metrics also
included the combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of outstanding combined
loans and total provision for loan losses as a percentage of revenues. Under
fair value accounting, a specific loan loss reserve is no longer required to be
recognized as a credit loss estimate is a key assumption used in measuring fair
value. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for further information.



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•Margin expansion.   We aim to manage our business to achieve a long-term
operating margin of 20%. In periods of significant loan portfolio growth, our
margins may become compressed due to the upfront costs associated with
marketing. Prior to our adoption of fair value for the loans receivable
portfolio, we incurred upfront credit provisioning expense associated with loan
portfolio growth. When applying fair value accounting, estimated credit loss is
a key assumption within the fair value assumptions used each quarter and
specific loan loss allowance is no longer required to be recognized. As we
continue to rebuild and scale our portfolio from the impacts of COVID-19, we
anticipate that our direct marketing costs primarily associated with new
customer acquisitions will be approximately 10% of revenues and our operating
expenses will decline to 20% of revenues. While our operating margins may exceed
20% in certain years, such as in 2020 when we incurred lower levels of direct
marketing expense and materially lower credit losses due to a lack of customer
demand for loans resulting from the effects of COVID-19, we do not expect our
operating margin to increase beyond that level over the long-term, as we intend
to pass on any improvements over our targeted margins to our customers in the
form of lower APRs. We believe this is a critical component of our responsible
lending platform and over time will also help us continue to attract new
customers and retain existing customers.

Choice of fair value option


Prior to January 1, 2022, we carried our combined loans receivable portfolio at
amortized cost, net of an allowance for estimated loan losses inherent in the
combined loan portfolio. Effective January 1, 2022, we elected the fair value
option to account for all our combined loan portfolio in conjunction with our
early adoption of Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments ("ASU
2016-13") and the related amendments. We believe the election of the fair value
option better reflects the value of our portfolio and its future economic
performance as well as more closely aligns with our decision-making processes
that relies on unit economics that align with discounted cash flow methodologies
that are utilized in fair value accounting. Refer to Note 1 for discussion of
the election and its impact on our accounting policies.

In accordance with the transition guidance, on January 1, 2022, we released the
allowance for loan losses and measured the combined loans receivable at fair
value at adoption. The cumulative-effect adjustment, net of tax, was recognized
collectively as a net increase of $98.6 million to opening Retained earnings.

In comparing our current period results under the fair value option to prior
periods, it may be helpful to consider that loans receivable are carried at fair
value with changes in fair value of loans receivable recorded in the Condensed
Consolidated Statements of Operations. The fair value takes into consideration
expected lifetime losses of the loans receivable, whereas the prior method
incorporated only incurred losses recognized as an allowance for loan losses. As
such, changes in credit quality, amongst other significant assumptions,
typically have a more significant impact on the carrying value of the combined
loans receivable portfolio under the fair value option. See "-Non-GAAP Financial
Measures" for further information.

Impact of COVID-19


The COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictive measures taken by governments,
businesses and individuals caused unprecedented uncertainty, volatility and
disruption in financial markets and in governmental, commercial and consumer
activity in the United States, including the markets that we serve. As the
restrictive measures have been eased in certain geographic locations, the U.S.
economy has begun to recover, and with the availability and distribution of
COVID-19 vaccines, we anticipate continued improvements in commercial and
consumer activity and the U.S. economy. While positive signs exist, we recognize
that certain of our customers are experiencing varying degrees of financial
distress, which may continue, especially if new COVID-19 variant infections
increase and new economic restrictions are mandated.

In 2020, we experienced a significant decline in the loan portfolio due to a
lack of customer demand for loans resulting from the effects of COVID-19 and
related government stimulus programs. These impacts resulted in a lower level of
direct marketing expense and materially lower credit losses during 2020 and
continuing into early 2021. Beginning in the second quarter of 2021, we
experienced a return of demand for the loan products that we, and the bank
originators we support, offer, resulting in significant growth in the loan
portfolio from that point. This significant loan portfolio growth resulted in
compressed margins in 2021 due to the upfront costs associated with marketing
and credit provisioning expense related to growing and "rebuilding" the loan
portfolio from the impacts of COVID-19. We continue to target loan portfolio
originations within our target CACs of $250-$300 and credit quality metrics of
45-55% of revenue which, when combined with our expectation of continuing
customer loan demand for our portfolio products, we believe will allow us to
return to our historical performance levels prior to COVID-19 after initially
resulting in earnings compression.



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Both we and the bank originators are closely monitoring the key credit quality
indicators such as payment defaults, continued payment deferrals, and line of
credit utilization. While we initially anticipated that the COVID-19 pandemic
would have a negative impact on our credit quality, instead the monetary
stimulus programs provided by the US government to our customer base have
generally allowed customers to continue making payments on their loans. At the
beginning of the pandemic, we expected an increase in net charge-offs as
compared to prior periods but experienced historically low net charge-offs as a
percentage of revenue in the second half of 2020 and early 2021. With the
increased volume of new customer loans we originated in the third and fourth
quarters of 2021 as we grew the loan portfolio to a level that approximated our
pre-pandemic size and the ending of government assistance, we are experiencing a
short-term increase in net charge-offs in excess of our targeted range with an
expectation of net charge-offs returning to our targeted range of 45-55% of
revenue as the portfolio becomes more seasoned with a balance of new and
returning customers, in the second half of 2022.

We have implemented a hybrid remote environment where employees may choose to
work primarily from the office or from home and gather collectively in the
office on a limited basis. We have sought to ensure our employees feel secure in
their jobs, have flexibility in their work location and have the resources they
need to stay safe and healthy. As a 100% online lending solutions provider, our
technology and underwriting platform has continued to serve our customers and
the bank originators that we support without any material interruption in
services.

COVID-19 has had a significant adverse impact on our business, and while
uncertainty still exists, we believe we are well-positioned to operate
effectively through the present economic environment and expect continued loan
portfolio growth and strong credit quality into the next year. We will continue
assessing our minimum cash and liquidity requirement, monitoring our debt
covenant compliance and implementing measures to ensure that our cash and
liquidity position is maintained through the current economic cycle.

KEY FINANCIAL AND OPERATIONAL INDICATORS


As discussed above, we regularly monitor a number of metrics in order to measure
our current performance and project our future performance. These metrics aid us
in developing and refining our growth strategies and in making strategic
decisions.

Certain of our metrics are non-GAAP financial measures. We believe that such
metrics are useful in period-to-period comparisons of our core business.
However, non-GAAP financial measures are not an alternative to any measure of
financial performance calculated and presented in accordance with US GAAP. See
"-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for a reconciliation of our non-GAAP measures to
US GAAP.

Revenues

                                                                                        As of and for the three months ended
                                                                                                      March 31,
Revenue metrics (dollars in thousands, except as noted)                                       2022                   2021
Revenues                                                                               $     124,244            $    89,733
Period-over-period change in revenue                                                              38    %               (45) %
Ending combined loans receivable - principal(1)                                        $     511,319            $   353,089
Average combined loans receivable - principal(1)(2)                                    $     535,857            $   378,877
Total combined loans originated - principal                                            $     205,487            $   133,514
Average customer loan balance(3)                                                       $       1,993            $     1,817
Number of new customer loans                                                                  19,303                 13,890
Ending number of combined loans outstanding                                                  256,615                194,331
Customer acquisition costs                                                             $         323            $       316
Effective APR of combined loan portfolio                                                          93    %                96  %


_________

(1)Combined loans receivable is defined as loans owned by us and consolidated
VIEs plus loans originated and owned by third-party lenders pursuant to our CSO
programs. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation of Combined loans receivable to Loans receivable, net, / Loans
receivable at fair value, the most directly comparable financial measures
calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(2)Average combined loans receivable - principal is calculated using an average
of daily Combined loans receivable - principal balances.
(3)Average customer loan balance is an average of all three products and is
calculated for each product by dividing the ending Combined loans receivable -
principal by the number of loans outstanding at period end.

Revenues. Our revenue is made up of Rise finance fees, Rise CSO fees (which are fees we receive from customers who obtain a loan through the CSO program for credit services, including loan guarantee, which we provide), revenue earned on the Elastic line of credit, and finance charges and fee revenue from the Today Card credit card product. See ”Components of Our Results of Operations – Revenues”.

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Ending and average combined loans receivable - principal.   We calculate the
average combined loans receivable - principal by taking a simple daily average
of the ending combined loans receivable - principal for each period. Key metrics
that drive the ending and average combined loans receivable - principal include
the amount of loans originated in a period and the average customer loan
balance. All loan balance metrics include only the 90% participation in the
related Elastic line of credit advances (we exclude the 10% held by Republic
Bank), the 96% participation in FinWise Bank originated Rise installment loans
and the 95% participation in CCB originated Rise installment loans and the 95%
participation in the CCB originated Today Card credit card receivables, but
include the full loan balances on CSO loans, which are not presented on our
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Total combined loans originated - principal.  The amount of loans originated in
a period is driven primarily by loans to new customers as well as new loans to
prior customers, including refinancing of existing loans to customers in good
standing.

Average customer loan balance and effective APR of combined loan portfolio.
The average loan amount and its related APR are based on the product and the
underlying credit quality of the customer. Generally, better credit quality
customers are offered higher loan amounts at lower APRs. Additionally, new
customers have more potential risk of loss than prior or existing customers due
to lack of payment history and the potential for fraud. As a result, newer
customers typically will have lower loan amounts and higher APRs to compensate
for that additional risk of loss. The effective APR is calculated based on the
actual amount of finance charges generated from a customer loan divided by the
average outstanding balance for the loan and can be lower than the stated APR on
the loan due to waived finance charges and other reasons. For example, a Rise
customer may receive a $2,000 installment loan with a term of 24 months and a
stated rate of 130%. In this example, the customer's monthly installment loan
payment would be $236.72. As the customer can prepay the loan balance at any
time with no additional fees or early payment penalty, the customer pays the
loan in full in month eight. The customer's loan earns interest of $1,657.39
over the eight-month period and has an average outstanding balance of $1,912.37.
The effective APR for this loan is 130% over the eight-month period calculated
as follows:

($1,657.39 interest earned / $1,912.37 average outstanding balance) x 12 months per year = 130%

8 months


In addition, as an example for Elastic, if a customer makes a $2,500 draw on the
customer's line of credit and this draw required bi-weekly minimum payments of
5% (equivalent to 20 bi-weekly payments), and if all minimum payments are made,
the draw would earn finance charges of $1,125. The effective APR for the line of
credit in this example is 107% over the payment period and is calculated as
follows:

($1,125.00 fees earned / $1,369.05 average unpaid balance) x 26 fortnight periods per year = 107%

20 payments


The actual total revenue we realize on a loan portfolio is also impacted by the
amount of prepayments and charged-off customer loans in the portfolio. For a
single loan, on average, we typically expect to realize approximately 60% of the
revenues that we would otherwise realize if the loan were to fully amortize at
the stated APR. From the Rise example above, if we waived $350 of interest for
this customer, the effective APR for this loan would decrease to 103%. From the
Elastic example above, if we waived $125 of fees for this customer, the
effective APR for this loan would decrease to 95%.

Number of new customer loans.  We define a new customer loan as the first loan
or advance made to a customer for each of our products (so a customer receiving
a Rise installment loan and then at a later date taking their first cash advance
on an Elastic line of credit would be counted twice). The number of new customer
loans is subject to seasonal fluctuations. New customer acquisition is typically
slowest during the first six months of each calendar year, primarily in the
first quarter, compared to the latter half of the year, as our existing and
prospective customers usually receive tax refunds during this period and, thus,
have less of a need for loans from us. Further, many customers will use their
tax refunds to prepay all or a portion of their loan balance during this period,
so our overall loan portfolio typically decreases during the first quarter of
the calendar year. Overall loan portfolio growth and the number of new customer
loans tends to accelerate during the summer months (typically June and July), at
the beginning of the school year (typically late August to early September) and
during the winter holidays (typically late November to early December).

Customer acquisition costs.  A key expense metric we monitor related to loan
growth is our CAC. This metric is the amount of direct marketing costs incurred
during a period divided by the number of new customer loans originated during
that same period. New loans to former customers are not included in our
calculation of CAC (except to the extent they receive a loan through a different
product) as we believe we incur no material direct marketing costs to make
additional loans to a prior customer through the same product.



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The following tables summarize the evolution of customer loans by product for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021.

                                                                   Three Months Ended March 31, 2022
                                                Rise                    Elastic                 Today
                                                                       (Lines of
                                         (Installment Loans)            Credit)             (Credit Card)             Total
Beginning number of combined
loans outstanding                              134,414                   110,628                  35,464              280,506
New customer loans originated                   12,147                     4,392                   2,764               19,303
Former customer loans originated                15,702                       136                       -               15,838
Attrition                                      (44,187)                  (12,183)                 (2,662)             (59,032)
Ending number of combined loans
outstanding                                    118,076                   102,973                  35,566              256,615
Customer acquisition cost (in
dollars)                                $          330              $        462          $           70          $       323
Average customer loan balance (in
dollars)                                $        2,341              $      1,806          $        1,376          $     1,993



                                                                   Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
                                                Rise                    Elastic                 Today
                                                                       (Lines of
                                         (Installment Loans)            Credit)             (Credit Card)             Total
Beginning number of combined
loans outstanding                              103,940                   100,105                  10,803              214,848
New customer loans originated                    8,656                     2,852                   2,382               13,890
Former customer loans originated                12,856                        94                       -               12,950
Attrition                                      (33,944)                  (13,030)                   (383)             (47,357)
Ending number of combined loans
outstanding                                     91,508                    90,021                  12,802              194,331
Customer acquisition cost (in
dollars)                                $          327              $        475          $           83          $       316
Average customer loan balance (in
dollars)                                $        2,209              $      1,514          $        1,149          $     1,817



Recent trends.  Our revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2022 totaled
$124.2 million, an increase of 38% versus the three months ended March 31, 2021.
The increase in quarterly revenue is primarily attributable to higher average
combined loans receivable-principal as we saw growth in all of our products in
the first quarter of 2022. Rise, Elastic, and the Today products experienced
year-over-year increases in revenues of 38%, 29%, and 254%, respectively, which
were attributable to increases in year-over-year average loan balances as we
focused on growing the portfolios beginning in the second half of 2021. The
Today Card balances increased significantly over the past year due to an
increase in marketing and origination activity during the second half of 2021,
and due to the nature of the product which provides an added convenience of
having a credit card for online purchases of day-to-day items such as groceries
or clothing (whereas the primary usage of a Rise installment loan or Elastic
line of credit is for emergency financial needs such as a medical deductible or
automobile repair).

We experienced an increase in new and former customers as demand for the loan
products provided by us and the bank originators increased beginning in the
second quarter of 2021 and continuing through the first quarter of 2022. This is
in contrast to 2020 and early 2021 when the portfolio of loan products
experienced significantly decreased loan demand for both new and former
customers due to COVID-19, including the effects of monetary stimulus provided
by the US government reducing demand for loan products. All three of our
products experienced an increase in principal loan balances in the first quarter
of 2022 compared to a year ago. Rise and Elastic principal loan balances at
March 31, 2022 totaled $276.4 million and $186.0 million, respectively, up
roughly $74.3 million and $49.7 million, respectively, from a year ago. Today
Card principal loan balances at March 31, 2022 totaled $48.9 million, up $34.2
million from a year ago.



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Our CAC was slightly higher in the first quarter of 2022 at $323 as compared to
the first quarter of 2021 at $316, with the first quarter CAC generally higher
than our targeted range of $250-$300 due to the seasonal decrease in loan demand
due to income tax refunds in the first quarter of each year. The new customer
loan volume is being sourced from all our marketing channels including direct
mail, strategic partners and digital. We've seen a marked improvement in loan
volume from our strategic partners channel where we have improved our technology
and risk capabilities to interface with the strategic partners via our
application programming interface (APIs) that we developed within our new
technology platform ("Blueprint"). Blueprint will allow us to more efficiently
acquire new customers within our targeted CAC range. We believe our CAC in
future quarters, and on an annual basis, will continue to remain within or below
our target range of $250 to $300 as we continue to optimize the efficiency of
our marketing channels and continue to grow the Today Card which successfully
generated new customers at a sub-$100 CAC.

Credit quality


                                                                         As 

from and for the three months ended March, 31stCredit quality measures (in thousands of dollars), after adopting fair value

                                                                      2022               2021 (Pro-forma)(6)
Net charge-offs(1)                                                       $      76,819            $           30,890
Net change in fair value(1)(6)                                                   7,340                         4,667
Total change in fair value of loans receivable (6)                       $      84,159            $           35,557

Net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues (1)                                     62    %                       34  %
Total change in fair value of loans receivable as a percentage of
revenues(6)                                                                         68    %                       40  %
Percentage past due                                                                 11    %                        6  %
Fair value premium(6)                                                               10    %                       13  %


                                                                              As of and for the three months ended
                                                                                            March 31,

Credit quality measures (in thousands of dollars), before the adoption of fair value

                                                                                    2021
Net charge-offs(2)                                                            $                      30,890
Additional provision for loan losses(2)                                                              (9,920)
Provision for loan losses                                                     $                      20,970

Total provision for loan losses as a percentage of revenues                                              23       %
Net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues(2)                                                           34       %
Percentage past due                                                                                       6       %
Combined loan loss reserve(4)                                                 $                      39,159
Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans
receivable(3)(4)(5)                                                                                      10       %


_________

(1)Net charge-offs and net change in fair value of loans receivable are not
financial measures prepared in accordance with US GAAP. Net charge-offs include
the amount of principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days
past due (Rise and Elastic) or 120 days past due (Today Card), or sooner if we
receive notice that the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice
or identified fraud, offset by any recoveries. Net change in fair value reflects
the adjustment recognized related to the change in the fair value mark during
the reported period. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and
for a reconciliation to Change in fair value of loans receivable, the most
directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(2)Net charge-offs and additional provision for loan losses are not financial
measures prepared in accordance with US GAAP. Net charge-offs include the amount
of principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due
(Rise and Elastic) or 120 days past due (Today Card), or sooner if we receive
notice that the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or
identified fraud, offset by any recoveries. Additional provision for loan losses
is the amount of provision for loan losses needed for a particular period to
adjust the combined loan loss reserve to the appropriate level in accordance
with our underlying loan loss reserve methodology. See "-Non-GAAP Financial
Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation to Provision for loan
losses, the most directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance
with US GAAP.
(3)Combined loans receivable is defined as loans owned by us and consolidated
VIEs plus loans originated and owned by third-party lenders pursuant to our CSO
programs. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation of Combined loans receivable to Loans receivable, net, the most
directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(4)Combined loan loss reserve is defined as the loan loss reserve for loans
originated and owned by us and consolidated VIEs plus the loan loss reserve for
loans owned by third-party lenders and guaranteed by us. See "-Non-GAAP
Financial Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation of Combined
loan loss reserve to Allowance for loan losses, the most directly comparable
financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(5)Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans receivable is
determined using period-end balances.



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(6)We have provided pro-forma information reflecting the adoption of fair value
in the 2021 financial period to provide comparability to the 2022 financial
period. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation to previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance
with US GAAP. The pro-forma fair value adjustments reflect fair value
methodology acceptable with US GAAP.

Net principal charge-offs as a percentage of
average combined loans receivable - principal                First              Second               Third              Fourth
(1)(2)(3)                                                   Quarter             Quarter             Quarter             Quarter
2022                                                          11%                 N/A                 N/A                 N/A
2021                                                          6%                  5%                  6%                  10%
2020                                                          11%                 10%                 4%                  5%


_________

(1)Net principal charge-offs is comprised of gross principal charge-offs less
recoveries.
(2)Average combined loans receivable - principal is calculated using an average
of daily Combined loans receivable - principal balances during each quarter.
(3)Combined loans receivable is defined as loans owned by us and consolidated
VIEs plus loans originated and owned by third-party lenders pursuant to our CSO
programs. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation of Combined loans receivable to the most directly comparable
financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.

Net principal charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans
receivable-principal for the first quarter of 2022 is higher than the first
quarter of 2021 and consistent with this credit metric during 2019 and the first
quarter of 2020. The above chart depicts the historically low charge-off metrics
from the third quarter of 2020 through the third quarter of 2021, due to
COVID-19 pandemic impacts such as a lack of new customer demand, our
implementation of payment assistance tools, and government stimulus payments
received by our customers. Beginning in the fourth quarter of 2021, net
principal charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans
receivable-principal have returned to the levels consistent with 2019 due to the
increased volume of new customers being originated as we rebuilt the loan
portfolio from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in the second half of 2021
and return to a more normalized credit profile.

Upon adoption of fair value for the combined loans receivable portfolio on
January 1, 2022, in reviewing the credit quality of our loan portfolio, we break
out our total change in fair value in loans receivable that is presented on our
Condensed Combined Statement of Operations under US GAAP into two separate
items-net charge-offs and net change in fair value. Net charge-offs are
indicative of the credit quality of our underlying portfolio, while net change
in fair value is subject to more fluctuation based on loan portfolio growth and
changes in assumptions used in the fair value methodology. The net change in
fair value is the change in the reporting period between the current period fair
value mark as compared to the beginning of period fair value mark. With all
other assumptions held flat and a fair value premium associated with the
combined loan portfolio, we would expect the net change in fair value to be
positive in periods of growth in the loan portfolio and expect the net change in
fair value to be negative in periods of attrition in the loan portfolio.

Net charge-offs. Net charge-offs comprise gross charge-offs offset by recoveries
on prior charge-offs. Gross charge-offs include the amount of principal and
accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due (Rise and Elastic)
or 120 days (Today Card), or sooner if we receive notice that the loan will not
be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or identified fraud. Any payments
received on loans that have been charged off are recorded as recoveries and
reduce the total amount of gross charge-offs. Recoveries are typically less than
10% of the amount charged off, and thus, we do not view recoveries as a key
credit quality metric.

Net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues can vary based on several factors,
such as whether or not we experience significant growth or lower the APR of our
products. Additionally, although a more seasoned portfolio will typically result
in lower net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues, we do not intend to drive
down this ratio significantly below our historical ratios and would instead seek
to offer our existing products to a broader new customer base to drive
additional revenues.

Net charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans receivable-principal
allow us to determine credit quality and evaluate loss experience trends across
our loan portfolio.



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Net change in fair value. Beginning January 1, 2022, we utilize the fair value
option on the combined loans receivable portfolio. As such, loans receivables
are carried at fair value in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets with
changes in fair value recorded in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of
Operations. To derive the fair value, we generally utilize discounted cash flow
analyses that factor in estimated losses and prepayments over the estimated
duration of the underlying assets. Loss and prepayment assumptions are
determined using historical loss data and include appropriate consideration of
recent trends and anticipated future performance. Hence, another key credit
quality metric we monitor is the percentage of past due combined loans
receivable - principal, as an increase in past due loans is a consideration in
the credit loss assumption used in the fair value assumptions as a significant
increase in the percentage of past due loans may indicate a future increase in
credit loss in the portfolio. As such, changes in credit quality, amongst other
significant assumptions, typically have a more significant impact on the
carrying value of the combined loans receivable portfolio under the fair value
option. Future cash flows are discounted using a rate of return that we believe
a market participant would require. Accrued and unpaid interest and fees are
included in Loans receivable at fair value in the Condensed Consolidated Balance
Sheets.

Additional provision for loan losses.  For financial data prior to January 1,
2022, in reviewing the credit quality of our loan portfolio, we broke out our
total provision for loan losses that was presented on our statement of
operations under US GAAP into two separate items-net charge-offs (as discussed
above) and additional provision for loan losses. The additional provision for
loan losses is the amount needed to adjust the combined loan loss reserve to the
appropriate amount at the end of each month based on our loan loss reserve
methodology.

Additional provision for loan losses relates to an increase in inherent losses
in the loan portfolio as determined by our loan loss reserve methodology. This
increase could be due to a combination of factors such as an increase in the
size of the loan portfolio or a worsening of credit quality or increase in past
due loans. It is also possible for the additional provision for loan losses for
a period to be a negative amount, which would reduce the amount of the combined
loan loss reserve needed (due to a decrease in the loan portfolio or improvement
in credit quality). The amount of additional provision for loan losses is
seasonal in nature, mirroring the seasonality of our new customer acquisition
and overall loan portfolio growth, as discussed above. The combined loan loss
reserve typically decreased during the first quarter or first half of the
calendar year due to a decrease in the loan portfolio from year end. Then, as
the rate of growth for the loan portfolio started to increase during the second
half of the year, additional provision for loan losses was typically needed to
increase the reserve for losses associated with the loan growth. Because of
this, our provision for loan losses varied significantly throughout the year
without a significant change in the credit quality of our portfolio.

Loan loss reserve methodology prior to January 1, 2022.  Our loan loss reserve
methodology was calculated separately for each product and, in the case of Rise
loans originated under the state lending model (including CSO program loans),
was calculated separately based on the state in which each customer resides to
account for varying state license requirements that affect the amount of the
loan offered, repayment terms and other factors. For each product, loss factors
were calculated based on the delinquency status of customer loan balances:
current, 1 to 30 days past due, 31 to 60 days past due or 61-120 past due (for
Today Card only). These loss factors for loans in each delinquency status were
based on average historical loss rates by product (or state) associated with
each of these three delinquency categories.

Recent trends.  Total change in fair value of loans receivable for the three
months ended March 31, 2022 and pro-forma three months ended March 31, 2021, was
68% and 40% of revenues, respectively, (See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for
more information and for a reconciliation to previously reported amounts for
2021 calculated in accordance with US GAAP.). Net charge-offs as a percentage of
revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 were 62% and 34%,
respectively. The increase in net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues is due
to the increase in originations beginning in the second half of 2021 with a
heavier mix of new customers into the loan portfolio which have a higher credit
loss profile than returning customers. We expect the second quarter net
charge-offs as a percentage of revenue to be at the high end of our target range
of 45-55% of revenue and will return within our target range during the second
half of 2022 as the mix of new and returning customers in the portfolio
normalizes. We continue to monitor the portfolio during the economic recovery
resulting from COVID-19 and recent macro-economic factors and will adjust our
underwriting and credit policies to mitigate any potential negative impacts as
needed.

Past due loan balances at March 31, 2022 were 11% of total combined loans
receivable-principal, up from 6% from a year ago, due to the number of new
customers originated beginning in the second quarter of 2021 which is consistent
with our historical past due percentages prior to the pandemic. We, and the bank
originators we support, are no longer offering specific COVID-19 payment
deferral programs but continue to offer other payment flexibility programs if
certain qualifications are met. We are continuing to see that most customers are
meeting their scheduled payments once they exit the payment deferral program.



                                       47
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Net change in fair value as a percentage of revenue was 6% for both March 31,
2022 and pro-forma March 31, 2021, as the fair value premium was relatively flat
with the fair value premiums calculated during the prior reporting periods (See
"-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation to
previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance with US GAAP.).
The fair value premium of the combined loans receivable-principal portfolio was
10% at March 31, 2022 compared to 13% at March 31, 2021 due to the composition
of the loan portfolio with an increased mix of newly originated loans at March
31, 2022 as compared to a more mature loan portfolio at March 31, 2021 due to
limited origination activity and significant paydowns experienced in the
portfolio due to the effects of COVID-19. The key assumptions used in the fair
value estimate at March 31, 2022 and 2021 are as follows:

                         March 31, 2022
Credit loss rate                   17  %
Prepayment rate                    27  %
Discount rate                      21  %



Total loan loss provision for the three months ended March 31, 2021, and prior
to the adoption of fair value, which was below our targeted range of
approximately 45% to 55%, was 23% of revenues. Net charge-offs as a percentage
of revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was 34% due to reduced
demand and limited loan origination activity in 2020 and early 2021 coupled with
customers' receipt of monetary stimulus provided by the US government which
allowed customers to continue making payments on their loans.

The combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans receivable
totaled 10% as of March 31, 2021. The lower historical combined loan loss
reserve rate reflects the strong credit performance of the portfolio at March
31, 2021 due to the mature nature of the portfolio resulting from limited new
loan origination activity in 2020 and early 2021.



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We also look at Rise and Elastic principal loan charge-offs (including both
credit and fraud losses) by loan vintage as a percentage of combined loans
originated-principal. As the below table shows, our cumulative principal loan
charge-offs for Rise and Elastic through March 31, 2022 for each annual vintage
since the 2013 vintage are generally under 30% and continue to generally trend
at or slightly below our 20% to 25% long-term targeted range. Our payment
deferral programs and monetary stimulus programs provided by the US government
in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have also assisted in reducing losses in
our 2019 and 2020 vintages coupled with a lower volume of new loan originations
in our 2020 vintage. While still early, we would expect the 2021 vintage to be
at or near 2018 levels or slightly lower given the increased volume of new
customer loans originated during the second half of 2021. It is also possible
that the cumulative loss rates on all vintages will increase and may exceed our
recent historical cumulative loss experience due to the economic impact of a
prolonged crisis resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic or the current
inflationary environment.[[Image Removed: elvt-20220331_g2.jpg]]

_________

1) The 2020 and 2021 vintages are not yet fully ripe from the point of view of losses. 2) UK included in 2013 to 2017 vintages only.



We also look at Today Card principal loan charge-offs (including both credit and
fraud losses) by account vintage as a percentage of account principal
originations. As the below table shows, our cumulative principal credit card
charge-offs through March 31, 2022 for the 2020 annual vintage is under 8%.
While our 2021 account vintage is currently performing better than 2020, we
expect the 2021 account vintage to have losses higher than the 2020 account
vintage based on the volume of new customers originated in the second half of
2021 and the performance of certain segments upon the release of the credit
model during 2021. The Today Card requires accounts to be charged off that are
more than 120 days past due which results in a longer maturity period for the
cumulative loss curve related to this portfolio. Our 2018 and 2019 vintages are
considered to be test vintages and were comprised of limited originations volume
and not reflective of our current underwriting standards.



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[[Image Removed: elvt-20220331_g3.jpg]]

Margins

                                                    Three Months Ended March 31,
Margin metrics (dollars in thousands)               2022                       2021
Revenues                                     $      124,244                 $ 89,733
Net charge-offs(1)                                  (76,819)                 (30,890)
Change in fair value(1)                              (7,340)                       -
Additional provision for loan losses(1)                   -                    9,920
Direct marketing costs                               (6,226)                  (4,383)
Other cost of sales                                  (2,882)                  (2,047)
Gross profit                                         30,977                   62,333
Operating expenses                                  (38,281)                 (37,594)
Operating income (loss)                      $       (7,304)                $ 24,739
As a percentage of revenues:
Net charge-offs                                          62   %                   34  %
Change in fair value                                      6                 

Additional provision for loan losses                      -                      (11)
Direct marketing costs                                    5                        5
Other cost of sales                                       2                        2
Gross margin                                             25                       69
Operating expenses                                       31                       42
Operating margin                                         (6)  %                   28  %


_________

(1) Non-GAAP measure. See “-Non-GAAP Financial Measures – Net Write-offs and Net Change in Fair Value” and “-Non-GAAP Financial Measures – Net Write-offs and Additional Allowance for Loan Losses”.

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Gross margin is calculated as revenues minus cost of sales, or gross profit,
expressed as a percentage of revenues, and operating margin is calculated as
operating income expressed as a percentage of revenues. Due to the negative
impact of COVID-19 on our loan balances and revenue, we are monitoring our
profit margins closely. Long-term, we intend to continue to manage the business
to a targeted 20% operating margin.

Recent operating margin trends.  For the three months ended March 31, 2022, our
operating margin was (6)%, which was a decrease from 28% in the prior year
period, as originally reported, and a decrease of 11% on a pro-forma basis
considering the pro-forma adoption of fair value at the beginning of 2021 (See
"-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation to
previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance with US GAAP.).
The margin decreases we are experiencing in 2022 are primarily driven by the
increased net charge-offs in the first quarter of 2022 due to a higher volume of
new customers originated in the loan portfolio during the second half of 2021 as
we rebuilt the portfolio from the impacts of COVID-19. As the portfolio matures
and we manage the mix of new and returning customers to the portfolio, we would
expect our net charge-offs to return to our target range of 45-55% and our gross
margin to normalize in future periods with our past historical performance. The
margins achieved in the first quarter of 2021 are not reflective of our
historical performance due to the limited origination activity in the loan
portfolio during 2020 and early 2021 due to a lack of customer demand resulting
from the effects of COVID-19 and related government stimulus programs. These
impacts resulted in a lower level of direct marketing expense and materially
lower credit losses during the first quarter of 2021 leading to an outsized
gross margin for the period.

Our operating expense metrics have been negatively impacted by the COVID-19
pandemic and its impact on loan balances and revenue. We began to see
improvements in our operating expense metric in the third and fourth quarter of
2021 due to the growth in the portfolio and associated increase in revenue
during those periods as we continued to manage and maintain a relatively
consistent operating expense during the latter half of the year and into the
first quarter of 2022. In the short term, with the continued growth in the loan
portfolio expected in 2022, we expect our expense metrics to continue to improve
and move toward our target range as we focus on growth to increase our new and
former customer loan volume and continue to scale the overall loan portfolio. In
the long term, as we grow the loan portfolio while actively managing our
operating expenses, we expect to see our operating expense metrics return to
approximately 20% of revenue.

NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES


We believe that the inclusion of the following non-GAAP financial measures in
this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q can provide a useful measure for
period-to-period comparisons of our core business, provide transparency and
useful information to investors and others in understanding and evaluating our
operating results, and enable investors to better compare our operating
performance with the operating performance of our competitors. Management uses
these non-GAAP financial measures frequently in its decision-making because they
provide supplemental information that facilitates internal comparisons to the
historical operating performance of prior periods and give an additional
indication of our core operating performance. However, non-GAAP financial
measures are not a measure calculated in accordance with US generally accepted
accounting principles, or US GAAP, and should not be considered an alternative
to any measures of financial performance calculated and presented in accordance
with US GAAP. Other companies may calculate these non-GAAP financial measures
differently than we do.


Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin

Adjusted EBITDA represents our net income (loss) adjusted to exclude:

• Net interest expense primarily associated with notes payable under credit facilities used to fund loan portfolios;

•Remuneration in shares;

• Depreciation of fixed assets and intangible assets;

• Gains or losses from an investment using the equity method;

•Settlement related to litigation included in non-operating income; and

•Income taxes.

Adjusted EBITDA margin is Adjusted EBITDA divided by revenue.


Management believes that Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin are useful
supplemental measures to assist management and investors in analyzing the
operating performance of the business and provide greater transparency into the
results of operations of our core business.



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Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin should not be considered as
alternatives to net income (loss) or any other performance measure derived in
accordance with US GAAP. Our use of Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin
has limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in
isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under US
GAAP. Some of these limitations are:

•Although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being
depreciated and amortized may have to be replaced in the future, and Adjusted
EBITDA does not reflect expected cash capital expenditure requirements for such
replacements or for new capital assets;

•Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect changes in or cash requirements for our working capital requirements; and


•Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect interest associated with notes payable used
for funding the loan portfolios, for other corporate purposes or tax payments
that may represent a reduction in cash available to us.

The following table provides a reconciliation of net earnings (loss) to Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin for each of the periods indicated:

                                          Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                    2022                       2021
Net income (loss)                  $      (13,923)                $ 12,716
Adjustments:
Net interest expense                       12,170                    8,786
Share-based compensation                    1,658                    1,602

Depreciation and amortization               3,761                    5,243

Equity method investment loss                 344                        -
Non-operating income                       (1,666)                    (207)
Income tax expense (benefit)               (4,229)                   3,444
Adjusted EBITDA                    $       (1,885)                $ 31,584

Adjusted EBITDA margin                       (1.5)  %                 35.2  %

Unaudited pro forma condensed consolidated financial information


The following unaudited pro-forma condensed consolidated statement of operations
information reflects the adoption of ASU 2016-13 as of January 1, 2021.
Management has made significant estimates and assumptions in its determination
of the pro-forma accounting adjustments based on certain currently available
information and certain assumptions and methodologies that we believe are
reasonable and consistent with US GAAP. Management believes the pro-forma
financial information is a useful supplemental measure to assist management and
investors in analyzing the operating performance of the business and provide
greater transparency into the results of operations of our core business.



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Three months completed March 31, 2021

                                                                                       Fair value          Pro-forma financial
(Dollars in thousands)                                    As reported                 adjustments              information
Revenues                                                $     89,733                $           -          $       89,733
Cost of sales:
Provision for loan losses                                     20,970                      (20,970)                      -
Change in fair value of loans receivable                           -                       35,557                  35,557
Direct marketing and other costs of sales                      6,430                            -                   6,430
Total costs of sales                                          27,400                       14,587                  41,987
Gross profit                                                  62,333                      (14,587)                 47,746
Total operating expenses                                      37,594                            -                  37,594
Operating income                                              24,739                      (14,587)                 10,152

Total other expense                                           (8,579)                           -                  (8,579)
Income before taxes                                           16,160                      (14,587)                  1,573
Income tax expense                                             3,444                       (2,940)                    504
Net income                                              $     12,716                $     (11,647)         $        1,069

Basic earnings per share                                $       0.35                $       (0.32)         $         0.03
Diluted earnings per share                              $       0.34                $       (0.31)         $         0.03

Adjusted EBITDA                                         $     31,584                $     (14,587)         $       16,997
Adjusted EBITDA margin                                          35.2   %                                             18.9     %


Free cash flow

Free cash flow (“FCF”) represents our net cash provided by operating activities, adjusted to include:

• Net write-offs – capital loans combined; and

• Capital expenditures.

The following table presents a reconciliation of the net cash provided by operating activities to the FCF for each of the periods indicated:

                                                         Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                                        2022                    2021

Net cash from operating activities(1) $49,935

        $ 31,880
Adjustments:
Net charge-offs - combined principal loans                 (59,793)                 (22,632)
Capital expenditures                                        (6,277)                  (3,383)
FCF                                               $        (16,135)                $  5,865


 _________

(1) Net cash from operating activities includes net charges – combined finance costs.




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Net charges and net change in fair value


We break out our total change in fair value into two separate items-first, the
amount related to net charge-offs, and second, net change in fair value needed
to adjust the current period fair value mark from the fair value mark from the
beginning of the reporting period. We believe this presentation provides more
detail related to the components of our total change in fair value when
analyzing the gross margin of our business.

Net charge-offs.  Net charge-offs comprise gross charge-offs offset by
recoveries on prior charge-offs. Gross charge-offs include the amount of
principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due
(Rise and Elastic) or 120 days (Today Card), or sooner if we receive notice that
the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or identified fraud.
Any payments received on loans that have been charged off are recorded as
recoveries and reduce total gross charge-offs.

Net change in fair value.  The net change in fair value is the change in the
reporting period between the current period fair value mark as compared to the
beginning of period fair value mark. With all other assumptions held flat and
fair value premium associated with the combined loan portfolio, we would expect
the net change in fair value to be positive in periods of growth in the loan
portfolio and expect the net change in fair value to be negative in periods of
attrition in the loan portfolio.

                                                                                Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                                                       2022                2021 (pro-forma)(1)

Net charge-offs                                                       $        76,819          $             30,890
Net change in fair value                                                        7,340                         4,667
Total change in fair value of loans receivable                        $        84,159          $             35,557


_________

(1)We have provided pro-forma information reflecting the adoption of fair value
in the 2021 financial period to provide comparability to the 2022 financial
period. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation to previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance
with US GAAP. The pro-forma fair value adjustments reflect fair value
methodology acceptable with US GAAP.

Net write-offs and additional provision for loan losses


We break out our total provision for loan losses into two separate items-first,
the amount related to net charge-offs, and second, the additional provision for
loan losses needed to adjust the combined loan loss reserve to the appropriate
amount at the end of each month based on our loan loss provision methodology. We
believe this presentation provides more detail related to the components of our
total provision for loan losses when analyzing the gross margin of our business.

Net charge-offs.  Net charge-offs comprise gross charge-offs offset by
recoveries on prior charge-offs. Gross charge-offs include the amount of
principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due
(Rise and Elastic) or 120 days (Today Card), or sooner if we receive notice that
the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or identified fraud.
Any payments received on loans that have been charged off are recorded as
recoveries and reduce total gross charge-offs.

Additional provision for loan losses.  Additional provision for loan losses is
the amount of provision for loan losses needed for a particular period to adjust
the combined loan loss reserve to the appropriate level in accordance with our
underlying loan loss reserve methodology.

                                                 Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                                       2021

Net charge-offs                                 $                      30,890
Additional provision for loan losses                                   (9,920)
Provision for loan losses                       $                      20,970


Combined loan information

The Elastic line of credit product is originated by a third-party lender,
Republic Bank, which initially provides all of the funding for that product.
Republic Bank retains 10% of the balances of all of the loans originated and
sells a 90% loan participation in the Elastic lines of credit to a third-party
SPV, Elastic SPV, Ltd. Elevate is required to consolidate Elastic SPV, Ltd. as a
VIE under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial statements include
revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 90% of Elastic lines of
credit originated by Republic Bank and sold to Elastic SPV.



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Beginning in the fourth quarter of 2018, we started licensing our Rise
installment loan brand to a third-party lender, FinWise Bank, which originates
Rise installment loans in 17 states. FinWise Bank retains 4% of the balances of
all the loans originated and sells a 96% participation to a third-party SPV, EF
SPV, Ltd. We do not own EF SPV, but we are required to consolidate EF SPV as a
VIE under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial statements include
revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 96% of Rise installment
loans originated by FinWise Bank and sold to EF SPV.

Beginning in 2018, we started licensing the Today Card brand and our
underwriting services and platform to launch a credit card product originated by
CCB, which initially provides all of the funding for that product. CCB retains
5% of the credit card receivable balance of all the receivables originated and
sells a 95% participation in the Today Card credit card receivables to us. The
Today Card program began expanding in 2020.

Beginning in the third quarter of 2020, we also license our Rise installment
loan brand to an additional bank, CCB, which originates Rise installment loans
in three different states than FinWise Bank. Similar to the relationship with
FinWise Bank, CCB retains 5% of the balances of all of the loans originated and
sells the remaining 95% loan participation in those Rise installment loans to EC
SPV. We do not own EC SPV, but we are required to consolidate EC SPV as a VIE
under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial statements include
revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 95% of the Rise installment
loans originated by CCB and sold to EC SPV.

The information presented in the tables below on a combined basis are non-GAAP
measures based on a combined portfolio of loans, which includes the total amount
of outstanding loans receivable that we own and that are on our balance sheets
plus outstanding loans receivable originated and owned by third parties that we
guarantee pursuant to CSO programs in which we participate. There were no new
loan originations in 2021 under our CSO programs, but we continued to have
obligations as the CSO until the wind-down of this portfolio was completed in
the third quarter of 2021. See "-Basis of Presentation and Critical Accounting
Policies-Allowance and liability for estimated losses on consumer loans."

We believe these non-GAAP measures provide investors with important information
needed to evaluate the magnitude of potential loan losses and the opportunity
for revenue performance of the combined loan portfolio on an aggregate basis. We
also believe that the comparison of the combined amounts from period to period
is more meaningful than comparing only the amounts reflected on our balance
sheet since both revenues and cost of sales as reflected in our financial
statements are impacted by the aggregate amount of loans we own and those CSO
loans we guaranteed.

Our use of total combined loans and fees receivable has limitations as an
analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation or as a substitute
for analysis of our results as reported under US GAAP. Some of these limitations
are:

• Rise CSO loans were originated and held by a third party lender; and

• The Rise CSO loans were funded by a third party lender and were not part of the VPC Facility.

At each of the period ends indicated, the following table presents a reconciliation of:

•Loans receivable, net and at fair value, held by the Company (which correspond to our condensed consolidated balance sheets included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q);


•Loans receivable, net, guaranteed by the Company (as disclosed in Note 3 of our
condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Quarterly
Report on Form 10-Q);

•Loans receivable combined (which we use as a non-GAAP measure); and

•Combined loan loss reserve (which we use as a non-GAAP measure).

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                                                                                       2021                                              2022
(Dollars in thousands)                                 March 31           June 30           September 30          December 31          March 31
Company Owned Loans:
Loans receivable - principal, current, company
owned                                                $ 331,251          $ 

372,068 $466,140 $501,552 $457,259
Loans receivable – principal, overdue, company property

                                           21,678             27,231                46,730              57,207             54,060
Loans receivable - principal, total, company
owned                                                  352,929            399,299               512,870             558,759            511,319
Loans receivable - finance charges, company
owned                                                   21,393             19,157                22,960              23,602             22,991
Loans receivable - company owned                       374,322            418,456               535,830             582,361            534,310
Allowance for loan losses on loans receivable,
company owned(5)                                       (39,037)           (40,314)              (56,209)            (71,204)                 -
Fair value adjustment, loans receivable-
principal                                                    -                  -                     -                   -             49,844
Loans receivable, net, company owned / Loans
receivable at fair value                             $ 335,285          $ 378,142          $    479,621          $  511,157          $ 584,154
Third Party Loans Guaranteed by the Company:
Loans receivable - principal, current,
guaranteed by company                                $     145          $   

$17 – $ – $ – Loans receivable – principal, past due, company guaranteed

                                       15                  4                     -                   -                  -
Loans receivable - principal, total,
guaranteed by company(1)                                   160                 21                     -                   -                  -
Loans receivable - finance charges, guaranteed
by company(2)                                               22                  4                     -                   -                  -
Loans receivable - guaranteed by company                   182                 25                     -                   -                  -
Liability for losses on loans receivable,
guaranteed by company                                     (122)                (7)                    -                   -                  -
Loans receivable, net, guaranteed by
company(3)                                           $      60          $      18          $          -          $        -          $       -
Combined Loans Receivable(3):
Combined loans receivable - principal, current       $ 331,396          $ 372,085          $    466,140          $  501,552          $ 457,259
Combined loans receivable - principal, past
due                                                     21,693             27,235                46,730              57,207             54,060
Combined loans receivable - principal                  353,089            399,320               512,870             558,759            511,319
Combined loans receivable - finance charges             21,415             19,161                22,960              23,602             22,991
Combined loans receivable                            $ 374,504          $ 418,481          $    535,830          $  582,361          $ 534,310
Combined Loan Loss Reserve(3):
Allowance for loan losses on loans receivable,
company owned(5)                                     $ (39,037)         $ 

(40,314) ($56,209) ($71,204) $ – Liability for losses on loans receivable, guaranteed by the company

                                     (122)                (7)                    -                   -                  -
Combined loan loss reserve(5)                        $ (39,159)         $ 

(40,321) ($56,209) ($71,204) $ – Combined Loans Receivable – Principal, Overdue(3)

                                               $  21,693          $  

27,235 $46,730 $57,207 $54,060
Combined loans receivable – principal(3)

               353,089            399,320               512,870             558,759            511,319
Percentage past due(1)                                       6  %               7  %                  9  %               10  %              11  %
Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of
combined loans receivable(3)(4)(5)                          10  %              10  %                 11  %               12  %               -  %
Allowance for loan losses as a percentage of
loans receivable - company owned(5)                         10  %              10  %                 11  %               12  %               -  %
Fair value adjustment, combined loans
receivable- principal(6)                             $  44,458          $  

51,078 $50,036 $57,184 $49,844


Combined loans receivable at fair value(6)             418,962            469,559               585,866             639,545            584,154
Fair value as a percentage of combined loans
receivable- principal(3)(6)                                113  %             113  %                110  %              110  %             110  %


_________
(1)Represents loans originated by third-party lenders through the CSO programs,
which are not included in our condensed consolidated financial statements. The
wind-down of the CSO program was completed in the third quarter of 2021.
(2)Represents finance charges earned by third-party lenders through the CSO
programs, which are not included in our condensed consolidated financial
statements. The wind-down of the CSO program was completed in the third quarter
of 2021.
(3)Non-GAAP measure
(4)Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans receivable is
determined using period-end balances.
(5)Effective January 1, 2022, upon the election to carry the loan portfolio at
fair value, a combined loan loss reserve and allowance for loan losses is no
longer required as a loan loss assumption has been included in the fair value
assumptions for the loan portfolio.
(6)The periods of March 31, 2021 to December 31, 2021 include pro-forma
adjustments reflecting the combined loans receivable at fair value consistent
with a fair value methodology acceptable with U.S. GAAP.





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COMPONENTS OF OUR OPERATING RESULTS

Revenue


Our revenues are composed of Rise finance charges and CSO fees (inclusive of
finance charges attributable to the participation in Rise installment loans
originated by FinWise Bank and CCB), cash advance fees attributable to the
participation in Elastic lines of credit that we consolidate, finance charges
and fee revenues related to the Today Card credit card product (inclusive of
finance charges attributable to the participations in the credit card
receivables originated by CCB), and marketing and licensing fees received from
third-party lenders related to the Rise, Rise CSO, Elastic, and Today Card
products. See "-Overview" above for further information on the structure of
Elastic.

Cost of sales


Change in Fair value. Beginning January 1, 2022, we elected the fair value
option for our loans receivable portfolio. As such, loans receivable are carried
at fair value in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets with changes in fair
value recorded in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. To derive
the fair value, we generally utilize discounted cash flow analyses that factor
in estimated losses and prepayments over the estimated duration of the
underlying assets. Loss and prepayment assumptions are determined using
historical loss data and include appropriate consideration of recent trends and
anticipated future performance. Future cash flows are discounted using a rate of
return that we believe a market participant would require.

Provision for loan losses. Prior to January 1, 2022, provision for loan losses
consists of amounts charged against income during the period related to net
charge-offs and the additional provision for loan losses needed to adjust the
loan loss reserve to the appropriate amount at the end of each month based on
our loan loss methodology.

Direct marketing costs.  Direct marketing costs consist of online marketing
costs such as sponsored search and advertising on social networking sites, and
other marketing costs such as purchased television and radio advertising and
direct mail print advertising. In addition, direct marketing cost includes
affiliate costs paid to marketers in exchange for referrals of potential
customers. All direct marketing costs are expensed as incurred.

Other cost of sales. Other costs of sales include data verification costs associated with signing up prospective customers and Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) transaction costs associated with funding and making loan payments to customers.

Operating Expenses


Operating expenses consist of compensation and benefits, professional services,
selling and marketing, occupancy and equipment, depreciation and amortization as
well as other miscellaneous expenses.

Benefits and compensation. Salaries and personnel costs, including benefits, bonuses and stock-based compensation expenses, constitute the majority of our operating expenses and these costs are determined by our number of employees.


Professional services.  These operating expenses include costs associated with
legal, accounting and auditing, recruiting and outsourced customer support and
collections.

Selling and marketing.  Selling and marketing costs include costs associated
with the use of agencies that perform creative services and monitor and measure
the performance of the various marketing channels. Selling and marketing costs
also include the production costs associated with media advertisements that are
expensed as incurred over the licensing or production period. These expenses do
not include direct marketing costs incurred to acquire customers, which
comprises CAC.

Occupancy and equipment. Occupancy and equipment includes rental charges for our leased facilities, as well as telephony and web hosting charges.


Depreciation and amortization.  We capitalize all acquisitions of property and
equipment of $500 or greater as well as certain software development costs.
Costs incurred in the preliminary stages of software development are expensed.
Costs incurred thereafter, including external direct costs of materials and
services as well as payroll and payroll-related costs, are capitalized.
Post-development costs are expensed. Depreciation is computed using the
straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the depreciable assets.








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Other expenses


Net interest expense.  Net interest expense primarily includes the interest
expense associated with the VPC Facility that funds the Rise installment loans,
the ESPV Facility related to the Elastic lines of credit and related Elastic SPV
entity, the EF SPV and EC SPV Facilities that fund Rise installment loans
originated by FinWise Bank and CCB, respectively, the TSPV facility used to fund
credit card receivable purchases, and the Pine Hill subordinated debt facility
used to fund working capital. Interest expense also includes any amortization of
deferred debt issuance cost and prepayment penalties incurred associated with
the debt facilities.

Gain or loss on investment using the equity method. Investment loss under the equity method includes our share of profit or loss associated with an investment in an unconsolidated subsidiary beginning in the first quarter of 2022.

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Steve Hodge lands record payday as Maradona ‘Hand of God’ shirt goes under the hammer https://clay-wood-winds.com/steve-hodge-lands-record-payday-as-maradona-hand-of-god-shirt-goes-under-the-hammer/ Wed, 04 May 2022 15:40:04 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/steve-hodge-lands-record-payday-as-maradona-hand-of-god-shirt-goes-under-the-hammer/ Nottingham Forest hero Steve Hodge has sold his worn Diego Maradona ‘Hand of God’ shirt for over £7million at auction. Former Forest midfielder Hodge swapped shirts with the legendary Maradona after the 1986 World Cup quarter-final between England and Argentina in Mexico, and has owned him ever since, although the article has spent the last […]]]>

Nottingham Forest hero Steve Hodge has sold his worn Diego Maradona ‘Hand of God’ shirt for over £7million at auction.

Former Forest midfielder Hodge swapped shirts with the legendary Maradona after the 1986 World Cup quarter-final between England and Argentina in Mexico, and has owned him ever since, although the article has spent the last 20 years on loan at the National Football Museum in Manchester. Maradona – one of the greatest footballers of all time, who died in November 2020 at the age of 60 – scored two unforgettable goals in the game, including one assisted by the ‘Hand of God’, as the England were eliminated from the tournament.

Hodge let the shirt go under the hammer at a specialist auction, but the Forest hero has reportedly faced a dramatic appeal from the Argentine FA begging him not to sell the historic shirt. It is unclear whether the Argentine delegation that traveled to England hoping to bring her back to the Maradona Museum in Buenos Aires was successful.

READ MORE:Evangelos Marinakis’ anger over Nottingham Forest controversy revealed

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The auction for Hodge’s shirt has now closed with a winning bid of £7,142,500 for the historic piece of football memorabilia – marking a new auction record for a sports memorabilia item, according to Sotherby’s.

For the past 20 years, the match kit has been loaned to England’s National Football Museum in Manchester.

Revealing why he is selling the iconic shirt, he said: “I have been the proud owner of this item for over 35 years, ever since Diego and I swapped shirts in the tunnel after the famous match. It was an absolute privilege to playing against one of the greatest and most magnificent footballers of all time.

“It was also a pleasure to share it with the public over the past 20 years at the National Football Museum, where it has been exhibited. The Hand of God shirt has deep cultural significance for the world of football, the people of Argentina, and the people of England and I am sure the new owner will be extremely proud to own the most iconic football shirt in the world.”

Should Steve Hodge have sold the famous Maradona shirt? Let us know in the comments section below…

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Helix enables banking as a service for fintechs https://clay-wood-winds.com/helix-enables-banking-as-a-service-for-fintechs/ Mon, 02 May 2022 19:42:01 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/helix-enables-banking-as-a-service-for-fintechs/ Ahon Sarkar, Managing Director Helix courtesy helix Helix by Q2 provides highly flexible banking as a service (BaaS) to fintech companies that have developed innovative services and then decided to offer a bespoke banking component as well. Helix’s clients include clients such as Acorns, Betterment, Credit Karma, Empower, Gusto, and M1. “Our focus is on […]]]>

Helix by Q2 provides highly flexible banking as a service (BaaS) to fintech companies that have developed innovative services and then decided to offer a bespoke banking component as well.

Helix’s clients include clients such as Acorns, Betterment, Credit Karma, Empower, Gusto, and M1.

“Our focus is on how we help these companies create unique products inside of what they already do,” said Ahon Sarkar, CEO of Helix in Q2. “They’re solving different problems for different demographics, and we’re moving from one size fits all to differentiated products built around people.”

The products that Helix by Q2 can offer include the building blocks of banking – accounts, cards, payments, data and controls, administration tools and monetization solutions – to facilitate the integration of personalized financial experiences.

For example, Gusto realized that the #1 problem many employees faced was managing cash flow and the #2 problem was building up savings. So they worked with Helix and launched Gusto Wallet – a way for employees to withdraw from their next paycheck for free instead of having to pay exorbitant interest to payday lenders. Gusto also launched an emergency savings product to help its customers save, which many users have accomplished for the first time.

Betterment, a pioneering robo-advisor (or digital wealth advisor in their marketing parlance), helps users create and maintain portfolios through its automated investment platforms. When customers wanted a way to spend the money that was in their Betterment account and maximize the return on the money they weren’t going to spend, Betterment partnered with Helix to launch a checking account alongside automated scanning functionality.

The checking account and debit card are provided by nbkc bank, originally the National Bank of Kansas City, which is a member of the FDIC and both a local brick-and-mortar bank and a national online bank .

Helix debuted about 10 years ago as Smartypig, a goal-based savings product, Sarkar said, with a very light banking core. It was rebranded as Social Money and later acquired by Q2 which markets itself as a leading provider of digital transformation solutions for banking and lending.

“Then, we [at Helix] realized that this kernel was more interesting than the products we built on it. We started to focus on customization. Everyone [in banking] was this one size fits all and we realized through our fintech partnerships that if you can actually customize the product for each user and give them progression, you see greater retention.

They started with payments, then goal-based savings, investing, money management with Credit Karma, and wealth management with Betterment.

“Now we’ll see people in loans, insurance, markets and games – concentric circles of adoption,” Sarkar said. “People are ready to adopt brand new technology that they have never seen before if someone in an adjacent industry has had success with it and they can figure out how to apply it.”

Helix expects announcements from new customers in these areas soon.

Credit Karma used Helix to provide banking services to its users. The company, known for providing credit ratings and advice on credit products, was acquired by Intuit in late 2020.

Credit Karma had up to 14 years of an individual member’s credit history – the amount they borrowed, their credit score, missed payments, and the amount of credit they used.

“We only had one aspect of a member’s financial life – borrowing and paying,” said Poulomi Damany, senior vice president and general manager of assets and tax at Credit Karma. But with Intuit and TurboTax, it could access the other side of the ledger for a member who used the tax preparation service and granted Credit Karma permission to access income information.

Equipped with detailed credit information about its users, Credit Karma considered the idea of ​​offering banking services. Three and a half years ago, it decided to test the market by offering a high-yield savings account to its members, using Helix and MVB Bank, Inc.

“People trust us with their credit data, will they also trust us with their money?”

The answer was yes they would, so about a year ago Credit Karma launched a checking account as well.

“Banks make money from fees,” Damany added. “The first thing we said was that we don’t want to charge any fees for these accounts. Our goal is to help members better manage their money,” she said. “We’ve partnered with TurboTax to make [tax] refunds available sooner. If you have a refund and are depositing into a Credit Karma Money account, we will make it available five days early. We have also made reimbursement advances. You can get part of your refund as soon as the IRS accepts it.

Debit cards don’t usually offer rewards, she added, and when they do, the rewards are very limited. “We have Instant Karma. Every time you use your debit card, you can get your entire purchase refunded. The behavior we encourage is that you spend the money you have and don’t go into debt.

“Credit Karma Money wants to be the best checking account for your credit score,” Damany explained. “Our bill payment features help members stay on top of their bills. Through this, we surface bills found in a member’s credit report, as these bills are most important to their score, and let them know when their bills are available and when they are due. We go one step further by identifying the best action a member can take to reduce their debt, including how much they need to pay, what loan they need to pay, and by what dates. Members who take action are likely to see their score increase.

Another innovation is a Credit Builder account, a locked savings account that looks like a line of credit. Members pay small amounts there and this is reported to the offices as a payment on a line of credit. “It’s a line of credit, for yourself,” she said. “Every time you save, we help you build credit, and in the end, you end up with $400 to $500 in emergency savings.”

As members improve their finances, they are rewarded with early payment – ​​paychecks made available two days early and instant check cashing. New features are coming, she added.

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CFPB targets non-banks for oversight – Dodd-Frank, Consumer Protection Act https://clay-wood-winds.com/cfpb-targets-non-banks-for-oversight-dodd-frank-consumer-protection-act/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 13:41:14 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/cfpb-targets-non-banks-for-oversight-dodd-frank-consumer-protection-act/ April 29, 2022 Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) recently announced that it will exercise so-called “dormant” authority to supervise non-banks that are not otherwise subject to the CFPB’s supervisory authority. […]]]>

To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) recently announced that it will exercise so-called “dormant” authority to supervise non-banks that are not otherwise subject to the CFPB’s supervisory authority. Since 2011, the CFPB has limited its oversight activities to banks, referred to as “large participants” in specific industry sectors such as credit reporting and mortgage and payday lenders. This expanded supervisory authority therefore suggests that the CFPB focus on gaining supervisory access to fintechs that are not involved in lending and that offer products or services to consumers. Basically, if a business is considered a “Covered Person” for the purposes of the Consumer Financial Protection Act (the “CFPA”, also known as Title X of the Dodd-Frank Act), then the CFPB could potentially claim to have supervisory authority over that company.

This supervisory authority is based on language in the CFPA which gives the CFPB supervisory authority when it “has reasonable grounds to determine” that a non-bank business “is engaging, or has engaged, in behavior that poses risks to consumers with respect to the offering or provision of consumer financial products or services.” 12 USC 5514(a)(1)(C). In 2013, the CFPB promulgated a rule of procedure in 12 CFR Part 1091 that defines how the CFPB can use this authority that has remained dormant to this day.

The rule provides that when the CFPB seeks to use this authority, it will send a “reasonable cause notice” that lists consumer complaints or other information that the CFPB has obtained that indicates that the non-bank covered person is engaging in conduct that poses risks to consumers. . Firms may initially rebuff the supervision attempt, but the appeal goes to the CFPB’s own Associate Director of the Lending Supervision, Enforcement and Equity Division, and then to the CFPB Director, no of them only being obligated to provide a particular level of unbiased review. In addition, although supervision is generally covered in confidentiality, the CFPB has additionally amended its rule of procedure so that, to the extent that the CFPB decides that a particular company is legitimately subject to supervision under this authority, the CFPB Director may choose to publish information indicating not only that the company is subject surveillance, but also the reasons why this company seems to present risks for consumers.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

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Wilmer Hale

A key element of the government’s ESG regulatory agenda is simple: investing in sustainable projects and businesses will help the UK achieve its environmental goals.

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Confirmation of major payday lender repayments https://clay-wood-winds.com/confirmation-of-major-payday-lender-repayments/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 15:35:00 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/confirmation-of-major-payday-lender-repayments/ THOUSANDS of QuickQuid customers could be set to receive a £900 refund, months after the business collapsed into administration. The payday lender collapsed in October 2019, leaving its customers in a state of financial uncertainty. 1 Refunds of up to £900 could be given to those who made successful claimsCredit: Getty It appeared that many […]]]>

THOUSANDS of QuickQuid customers could be set to receive a £900 refund, months after the business collapsed into administration.

The payday lender collapsed in October 2019, leaving its customers in a state of financial uncertainty.

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Refunds of up to £900 could be given to those who made successful claimsCredit: Getty

It appeared that many customers may have been mis-sold by the company and could therefore be compensated.

Some 169,000 customers have made claims against the company. Of these, more than 78,500 claims, totaling £135.7 million, have been confirmed.

These customers are now starting to receive emails detailing exactly how much money they will receive.

Grant Thornton, the company appointed as administrator, has confirmed that eligible customers will get back 53.5p for every pound claimed.

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This equates to around £910 with an average claim value of £1,700.

QuickQuid was one of the biggest lenders in the UK until it took over a few years ago in October 2019.

It had around 500,000 customers with outstanding loans at the time and had lent money to over a million customers since its launch in 2007.

But many of these borrowers found themselves so short of money after prolonged borrowing from the company that they had to borrow even more.

Anyone who received these unaffordable loans has been able to claim a refund, even if they repaid their loan years ago – and some will receive up to £900 in return.

Complaints have been pouring in since 2015 about QuickQuid’s unaffordable loans.

In 2008, it became the most denounced firm to financial mediators, according to Sarah Williams, founder of Debt Camel.

The online claims portal closed on February 14, 2021, which means that refunds can no longer be requested.

Grant Thornton said: “Please note that if successful, the payment you will receive will be significantly less than the value of your accepted claim.”

Indeed, the value of all accepted claims will greatly exceed the money available to share.

Repayment calculations could only be made once the assets of CashEuroNet, which owned QuickQuid, were sold and other deductions were made.

If you have any questions regarding your complaint, contact the CashEuroNet customer support team on 0800 0163 250.

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Rail unions refuse advance payments in favor of new agreement https://clay-wood-winds.com/rail-unions-refuse-advance-payments-in-favor-of-new-agreement/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 20:19:56 +0000 https://clay-wood-winds.com/rail-unions-refuse-advance-payments-in-favor-of-new-agreement/ An American flag is displayed on this Union Pacific Railroad locomotive located in the terminal yard in Jackson, Mississippi, Wednesday, April 20, 2022. Union Pacific made 22% more profit in the first quarter as it billed more and delivered 4% more shipments even as it struggled to clear congestion along its rail network. The Omaha, […]]]>

An American flag is displayed on this Union Pacific Railroad locomotive located in the terminal yard in Jackson, Mississippi, Wednesday, April 20, 2022. Union Pacific made 22% more profit in the first quarter as it billed more and delivered 4% more shipments even as it struggled to clear congestion along its rail network.  The Omaha, Nebraska Railroad announced Thursday that it earned $1.6 billion, or $2.57 per share.  (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

An American flag is displayed on this Union Pacific Railroad locomotive located in the terminal yard in Jackson, Mississippi, Wednesday, April 20, 2022. Union Pacific made 22% more profit in the first quarter as it billed more and delivered 4% more shipments even as it struggled to clear congestion along its rail network. The Omaha, Nebraska Railroad announced Thursday that it earned $1.6 billion, or $2.57 per share. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

PA

All major railroads now plan to offer their employees up to $600 a month in advance of the raises they expect to pay once the ongoing two-year-old national contract negotiations will eventually be settled.

But a coalition of unions that represents more than 105,000 rail workers said on Monday it would withhold the payments in part because workers would be required to return some of the money if any increases are not large enough to cover the payments. . The unions instead want the National Carriers Conference Committee, which represents more than 30 railroads, to negotiate a contract.

“This latest proposal, somewhere between a loan and a payday advance, is just further evidence that the NCCC has no intention of reaching a voluntary settlement anytime soon,” the unions said in a statement. communicated. “You don’t offer temporary proposals if you plan to offer full contract settlement.”

The group which represents the railways said it would keep its offer on the table as it would quickly put cash in the pockets of workers at a time of soaring inflation while other issues are being ironed out at the negotiating table. The railways said the pandemic has made progress in negotiations difficult as few face-to-face meetings have taken place.

“Railroad employees work hard and deserve pay increases that keep them among the highest paid employees in the country,” the railroads said in a statement. “The railways want to reach new national agreements with the labor organizations providing these increases, but the issues at the national bargaining table are complex and there is still work to be done before full agreements can be finalized.

The railroads all announced their proposed payout on Friday days after CSX announced it had offered those payouts to its unions. CSX and Union Pacific executives said when announcing their earnings last week that a package deal with the unions was likely still a long way off.

Union Pacific and CSX both reported a 22% increase in revenue as railroads were able to raise fares and collect more fuel surcharges even as they struggled to clear congestion on their rail networks, which delayed deliveries to customers.

Contract talks remain mired in mediation as the railways pursue unpopular proposals to cut rail crews from two to one in certain circumstances. Unions are also unwilling to make major concessions in labor rules after seeing nearly a third of all rail jobs cut in the past six years as major freight railways overhauled their operations.

Unions have also complained that BNSF and Union Pacific have imposed tough new attendance rules over the past two years without negotiating them, making it difficult for workers to take days off.

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